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INTERNATIONAL: Germany -- World Tribune: Window on the Real World

Drug News Bot - Wed, 11/22/2017 - 00:06
worldtribune.com [ ...] ... (Wed Nov 22 01:06:00 2017 PST) [$drug_related(100%), $drugwar_propaganda(75%), $explicit_propaganda(70%), $propaganda_theme1(55%), $propaganda_theme2(70%), $propaganda_theme3(50%), $propaganda_theme6(75%), $illegal_drugs(100%), $drugs(90%), $opioid(100%), $narcotic(100%), $various_drugs(90%), $aggrandizement(100%)]
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CANADA: Scotchtown woman's drug charge reduced - Local - News - Cape Breton Post

Drug News Bot - Wed, 11/22/2017 - 00:06
capebretonpost.com (US) Of Thomas Street was initially charged with possession for the purpose of trafficking in marijuana but the offence was reduced to possession only. (Wed Nov 22 02:06:39 2017 PST) [$drug_related(100%), $illegal_drugs(100%), $drugs(90%), $plants(100%), $intoxicant(100%), $opioid(100%), $narcotic(100%), $cannabis(100%), $various_drugs(90%), $various_illegal_drugs(100%), $jury(100%), $meeting(95%)]
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CANADA: Liberals announce pot regulations -- consultation - Brockville Recorder

Bot - Cannabis - Wed, 11/22/2017 - 00:04
recorder.ca (Canada) Liberals announce pot regulations b consultation ! Brockville Recorder Liberals announce Canadian legalized marijuana regulations with public consultation Liberals announce Canadian legalized marijuana regulations... (Wed Nov 22 02:04:13 2017 PST)
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CANADA: Liberals announce pot regulations -- consultation - Brockville Recorder

Drug News Bot - Wed, 11/22/2017 - 00:04
recorder.ca (Canada) Liberals announce pot regulations b consultation ! Brockville Recorder Liberals announce Canadian legalized marijuana regulations with public consultation Liberals announce Canadian legalized marijuana regulations... (Wed Nov 22 02:04:13 2017 PST) [$drug_related(100%), $drugwar_propaganda(100%), $propaganda_theme2(55%), $propaganda_theme3(50%), $use_is_abuse(100%), $propaganda_theme4(100%), $propaganda_theme7(100%), $illegal_drugs(100%), $legalization(100%), $chemicals(50%), $plants(100%), $intoxicant(100%), $depressant_intoxicant(50%), $medical_cannabis(100%), $alcohol(50%), $cannabis(100%), $tobacco(100%)]
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CANADA: Police launch Festive RIDE campaign - Barrie Examiner

Drug News Bot - Wed, 11/22/2017 - 00:01
thebarrieexaminer.com (Canada) This year marks the 30th anniversary of the Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) Red Ribbon campaign, a milestone that will hardly be celebrated. RIDE programs have been operating throughout the year, and Tuesday's kick-off was a way to show the public those pr... (Wed Nov 22 02:01:26 2017 PST) [$drug_related(100%), $drugwar_propaganda(100%), $explicit_propaganda(100%), $propaganda_theme2(75%), $propaganda_theme3(55%), $propaganda_theme5(70%), $red_ribbon(100%), $drug_ngo(100%), $drug_reform_ngo(50%), $ramp(50%), $govt_prohib_other(50%), $prohibitionist_ngo(100%), $chemicals(100%), $depressant_intoxicant(100%), $alcohol(100%), $youth(70%), $school(100%)]
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CANADA: School van hits truck - Barrie Examiner

Drug News Bot - Wed, 11/22/2017 - 00:01
thebarrieexaminer.com (Canada) The driver of a school van was charged after it struck a waste management truck from behind Tuesday morning on the Highway 400 off-ramp to Bayfield Street. (Wed Nov 22 02:01:26 2017 PST) [$drug_related(50%), $drugwar_propaganda(50%), $propaganda_theme2(50%), $propaganda_theme3(50%), $propaganda_theme5(50%), $drug_ngo(50%), $drug_reform_ngo(50%), $ramp(50%), $youth(50%), $school(100%), $aggrandizement(100%)]
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Last stop for cannabis advertising on Muni buses, trains, stations and stops - SFGate

Google - Cannabis - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 21:15

SFGate

Last stop for cannabis advertising on Muni buses, trains, stations and stops
SFGate
The board approved the prohibition on a 6-0 vote, with Director Malcolm Heinicke absent. It takes effect Wednesday just six weeks before the sale of marijuana becomes legal throughout the state and covers all commercial advertising of cannabis and ...
SFMTA Votes to Ban Cannabis Advertising on City Buses, Trains and Transit StopsNBC Bay Area

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Former addict recounts past at Sherwood Park cannabis legalization forum - Edmonton Journal

Google - Cannabis - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 20:38

Edmonton Journal

Former addict recounts past at Sherwood Park cannabis legalization forum
Edmonton Journal
Former drug dealer and addict Utah Johanson poses for a photo while attending a Parents Empowering Parents (PEP) forum on the coming legalization of marijuana and the challenges facing youth, in Sherwood Park on Tuesday, Nov. 21, 2017. David Bloom ...

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Lawsuit: State of Florida Ignoring Medical Marijuana Law - Leafly

Google - Cannabis - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 16:50

Leafly

Lawsuit: State of Florida Ignoring Medical Marijuana Law
Leafly
“In cases like mine, medical marijuana is literally the only thing that can control my seizures and keep me alive,” Bowen said in a statement. “But the Florida Department of Health's inexcusable foot-dragging is keeping patients like me from getting ...
Jacksonville company set to produce state's marijuana ID cardsFirst Coast News
Florida officials decide waiting for medical marijuana ID card dispute would hurt patientsThe Cannabist

all 15 news articles »
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Colorado Cannabis Expert to Have South Dakota Criminal Case Dismissed - Leafly

Google - Cannabis - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 15:44

Leafly

Colorado Cannabis Expert to Have South Dakota Criminal Case Dismissed
Leafly
Jonathan Hunt, a consultant from Denver-based consulting firm Monarch America, checks the roots of marijuana seedlings growing in the germinating facility on the Flandreau Santee Sioux Reservation in Flandreau, S.D., in this Sept. 24, 2015 photo.

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African Americans Are Disproportionately Arrested for Low-Level Marijuana Violations—and the Disparity Is Growing

Alternet - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 14:31
Click here for reuse options! Blacks are nearly four times more likely than whites to be arrested for minor pot possession violations.

According to a groundbreaking 2013 report authored by the American Civil Liberties Union, African Americans in the United States are nearly four times more likely than whites to be arrested for minor marijuana possession violations. "[O]n average, a black person is 3.73 times more likely to be arrested for marijuana possession than a white person, even though blacks and whites use marijuana at similar rates,” it concluded. “Such racial disparities in marijuana possession arrests exist in all regions of the country, in counties large and small, urban and rural, wealthy and poor, and with large and small black populations. Indeed, in over 96 percent of counties with more than 30,000 people in which at least 2 percent of the residents are black, blacks are arrested at higher rates than whites for marijuana possession."

In the four years since the publication of that report, public opinion (and to a lesser extent, political opinion) in favor of amending America’s marijuana penalties has shifted dramatically. Yet, according to several recent analyses of marijuana arrest data, the racial disparity among those criminally charged with violating the nation’s pot laws has become more pronounced.

Some examples:

In Virginia, African Americans are arrested for marijuana possession crimes at more than three times the rate of whites, according to a 2017 analysis by Virginia Commonwealth University’s Capital News Service.  Since 2010, this disparity has risen an estimated ten percent.

In New Jersey, blacks are arrested for pot possession crimes at three times the rates of whites, according to an ACLU New Jersey analysis published earlier this year. Since 2000, this disparity increased nearly 25 percent.

In Pennsylvania, African Americans are arrested for cannabis crimes at six times the rates of whites in 66 out of 67 counties (excluding Philadelphia, which decriminalized adult use possession offenses in 2014), according to an ACLU Pennsylvania analysis released in October. This disparity has largely held steady since 2010.

In Western New York, blacks in Erie County (which includes the city of Buffalo) are 13.5 percent of the population, but comprise over 71 percent of all low-level marijuana arrestees, according to a report released this month by the group Partnership for the Public Good. “[T]he disparities in the number of marijuana possession arrests cannot be explained by a higher use among black or Hispanic people,” authors concluded. “Legalizing marijuana would reduce low-level drug arrests by 10 percent, and help reduce racial disparities in overall arrest numbers.”

In New York City, blacks and Latinos comprised 51 percent of the population, but 86 percent of those arrested for marijuana possession violations during the years 2014 to 2016, according to a 2017 review of arrest data by the Drug Policy Alliance.

As these disparities grow, some politicians are saying enough. Specifically, New Jersey Gov.-elect Phil Murphy campaigned on a pledge to do away with criminal justice “policies that disproportionately target communities of color” – such as cannabis criminalization. The incoming Democrat Governor – who replaces ardent pot prohibitionist Chris Christie – promises that enacting adult use legalization “is a 2018 priority.”

At the federal level, Senator Corey Booker (D-NJ) is spearheading Senate Bill 1689, Marijuana Justice Act of 2017 – arguably the most progressive and far-reaching cannabis legalization measure ever introduced. It would remove marijuana from the US Controlled Substances Act, thereby ending the federal criminalization of cannabis; (2) incentivize states to mitigate existing racial disparities in state-level marijuana arrests; (3) expunge federal convictions specific to marijuana possession; (4) allow individuals currently serving time in federal prison for marijuana-related violations to petition the court for resentencing; (5) and create a community reinvestment fund to invest in communities most impacted by the drug war.

“I’m the only U.S. senator I think in the history of our country that lives in an inner-city community that is overwhelmingly predominantly black and Latino,” the senator said at a rally for the act in August. “I see it firsthand in our nation how we have very different sets of laws for different communities. That the war on drugs is a war on people, but particularly it has been a war on low income people and disproportionately a war on minorities.”

For those communities bearing the brunt of cannabis law enforcement, the sort of legislative changes proposed by Sen. Booker and Gov.-elect Murphy cannot come soon enough. Racial prejudices and fear-mongering ushered in the era of pot prohibition; the growing awareness of how marijuana law enforcement continues to disproportionately impact those of color ought to expedite its repeal.

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Canada Announces Craft-Scale Licenses for Smaller Cannabis Producers - Leafly

Google - Cannabis - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 14:21

Leafly

Canada Announces Craft-Scale Licenses for Smaller Cannabis Producers
Leafly
Up until now, medical cannabis producers under the country's ACMPR (medical marijuana) system were only subject to one tier of licensing, with cultivation and sales licenses doled out for the production and sale of dried cannabis and cannabis oil. A ...
Statistics Canada will measure social and economic impacts of cannabisStraight.com
A “misguided crusade”: Canada's bill to legalize cannabis faces oppositionThe Cannabist

all 8 news articles »
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Across State Lines: One Medical Cannabis Refugee's Journey to Colorado and Back - Leafly

Google - Cannabis - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 12:26

Leafly

Across State Lines: One Medical Cannabis Refugee's Journey to Colorado and Back
Leafly
In late 2008, Barry Lauder started to see double in one eye. By 2009, with a collection of doctor's appointments, tests, and unanswered questions lining his patient file, the Maryland native was diagnosed with nystagmus—a condition marked by ...

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Statistics Canada to begin recreational cannabis study, even before it's legal - BNN

Google - Cannabis - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 10:54

BNN

Statistics Canada to begin recreational cannabis study, even before it's legal
BNN
The agency says collecting data both before and after marijuana becomes legal will allow Canadians, governments and businesses to form a clearer picture of the economic and social consequences of lawful pot.. The Liberals are coming in for criticism ...
Proposed pot regulations open door to craft growers, licensing non-violent offendersCBC.ca
Proposed cannabis regs would call for tobacco-style warnings for potCTV News
Ottawa takes cover off regulation plan for recreational cannabisWinnipeg Free Press
The Globe and Mail -News1130 -Toronto Star
all 88 news articles »
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In These States, Past Marijuana Crimes Can Go Away

Alternet - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 10:42
Ending pot prohibition is only the beginning. We also need to repair the harms caused by it, and expunging old convictions is a start.

When Californians voted to legalize marijuana last year, they also voted to let people petition courts to reduce or hide convictions for past marijuana crimes. State residents can now petition courts to change some felonies to misdemeanors, change some misdemeanors to infractions, and wipe away convictions for possessing or growing small amounts of the drug.

“We call it reparative justice: repairing the harms caused by the war on drugs,” says Eunisses Hernandez of the Drug Policy Alliance, a nonprofit advocacy group that helped write the California ballot initiative.

Colorado, Maryland, New Hampshire and Oregon also have made it easier for people convicted of some crimes of marijuana possession, cultivation or manufacture to get their records sealed or expunged, which generally means removing convictions from public databases. Massachusetts lawmakers are considering a criminal justice bill that would, among other changes, allow people to expunge any conviction that’s no longer a crime, such as marijuana possession.

These efforts by states that have legalized or decriminalized marijuana are part of a national trend toward making it easier for people to seal or expunge a range of convictions. Americans with a criminal record — whether it’s marked with felonies, misdemeanors or both — can find it harder to get a job and find housing.

Hernandez and other social justice advocates say marijuana legalization should be paired with criminal justice reforms that help people convicted of past drug crimes rebuild their lives.

Yet allowing people to seal their criminal records or reclassify convictions is not the rule in states that have legalized or decriminalized possession of small amounts of marijuana. Bills that would remove or reduce convictions on people’s records are often opposed by lawmakers and prosecutors who argue that people who knowingly violated prior laws shouldn’t be let off the hook just because the law changed.

California has done more than any other state to require judges to excuse residents’ past marijuana crimes. That’s because the state took the issue to voters, Hernandez said. “Through the Legislature, we would not have gotten this.”

The Expungement Debate

In states that have legalized marijuana, some lawmakers say reducing old marijuana-related convictions is a no-brainer. “Since this is now the law of Nevada, it’s important that we allow folks who have made these mistakes in the past to have their records sealed up,” said Nevada Assemblyman William McCurdy, a Democrat who proposed a bill on the issue this year.

McCurdy hails from a poor area of Las Vegas. He knows people who have been convicted of possessing an ounce or less of marijuana — formerly a misdemeanor — and who are struggling to overcome the black mark on their record, he said. “They’re labeled now.”

After Oregonians voted to legalize marijuana possession, in 2014, most lawmakers agreed it was only fair to give people relief for past crimes that had become legal in the state, such as possessing up to an ounce of marijuana or growing up to six marijuana plants.

Provisions that allow certain records to be sealed were an uncontroversial part of a 2015 law that codified the ballot initiative, said Amy Margolis, a lawyer and director of the Oregon Cannabis Association, a trade association and advocacy group. It helped that Oregon already made it fairly easy for people convicted of minor crimes to get them set aside, she said.

Colorado lawmakers took more convincing. The Legislature considered a bill in 2014 that would have allowed people to petition to seal records of marijuana possession convictions that the state no longer considered illegal. But the bill died in committee after facing opposition from prosecutors.

“[The bill] creates a horrible precedent by retrofitting criminal sanctions for past conduct every time a new law is changed or passed,” Carolyn Tyler, a spokeswoman for Republican Attorney General John Suthers, told The Denver Post at the time.

District attorneys opposed the bill because it would have allowed small-time drug dealers to get their records sealed, said Thomas Raynes, executive director of the Colorado District Attorneys’ Council. “There were many cases of distribution that were pleaded to low-level [possession] felonies,” he said. This year, Colorado enacted a less controversial law targeted only at misdemeanor possession.

Proposals in other states also have been stalled by concerns that they’d force judges to let lawbreakers off the hook. In Washington, an oft-proposed bill that would require judges to vacate convictions for possession of fewer than 40 grams of marijuana has gone nowhere, partly because possession of 28 grams to 40 grams is still a misdemeanor in the state.

And in Nevada this year, the governor’s veto pen stopped McCurdy’s bill that would have required judges to seal records and vacate judgments for marijuana offenses that are now legal.

“To the extent that there are individuals suffering under criminal records for conduct now legal in Nevada, those cases are best handled on a case-by-case basis,” Gov. Brian Sandoval, a Republican, wrote in his veto statement. He added that given other reforms to the sealing and expungement process in Nevada, a marijuana-specific law wasn’t necessary.

Limited Impact?

Defense lawyers and other advocates for decreasing penalties for nonviolent drug crimes say that sealing someone’s record can change their life. Yet state data from Oregon and California — the states that have done the most to allow people to take convictions off their records — suggest that so far, only a fraction of people with marijuana convictions have asked to get them sealed or set aside.

Nearly half a million people were arrested for marijuana crimes in California over the past decade, according to the Drug Policy Alliance. But California courts have received just 1,506 applications for reclassifying past marijuana-related crimes since state residents gained the option to do so last year.

The Drug Policy Alliance also says that more than 78,000 convictions could be set aside in Oregon. But courts received just 388 requests for set-asides in cases that involved a marijuana charge in 2015, 453 in 2016, and 365 so far this year, according to the Oregon Judicial Department.

It could be that many people just don’t know they can get their records sealed. Marijuana industry and legal defense groups have hosted free events in both states to help people file the right paperwork — though in both states, lawyers say filing a petition is straightforward enough to handle without an attorney.

Another problem may be that many people have complicated criminal records, Margolis said. “Those people — they have not benefited.”

Courts are more likely to reject petitions from people with long criminal histories, Margolis said. For instance, someone’s conviction for marijuana cultivation might be paired with a money-laundering conviction, a delivery conviction, or a criminal-mischief conviction because a house was vandalized.

Some people may just decide that hiding their conviction from view isn’t worth the hassle. If someone has another crime on his record that can’t be wiped away, say an unrelated felony, he might not bother to eliminate a minor marijuana conviction.

One of the convictions that can be sealed in Colorado and California is possession of an ounce or less of marijuana. But in both states, even before marijuana possession was legalized, possession of a small amount of marijuana was just an infraction or a petty offense, punishable by a $100 fine.

Still, the California ballot initiative’s emphasis on criminal justice reform and releasing people from the burden of past crimes may be the new normal moving forward. The initiative has become “the gold standard,” said Art Way, director of the Drug Policy Alliance’s Colorado office. He said that activists in New Mexico, New Jersey and New York are all lobbying for racial justice and, to some extent, retroactive relief for marijuana crimes. 

 

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Cassidy Busted for Pot ... Outstanding Warrants - TMZ.com

Google - Cannabis - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 09:39

TMZ.com

Cassidy Busted for Pot ... Outstanding Warrants
TMZ.com
The Philly MC was busted Sunday afternoon in Jersey City when police say they spotted him in the vehicle, and noticed a strong marijuana odor. Officers say there was a joint sitting in clear view on the dashboard. They also found a baggie of weed and a ...
Cassidy Arrested for Marijuana Possession and Drug Paraphernalia in New JerseyXXLMAG.COM

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FL: Tabb has 26, Bethune-Cookman tops Grambling 87-78 - WJAX-TV

Bot - Cannabis - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 00:58
actionnewsjax.com (US) Lawsuit: State of Florida ignoring medical marijuana law Tribe's marijuana consultant pays fine, court costs ... (Tue Nov 21 19:58:53 2017 PST)
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FL: Lawsuit: State of Florida ignoring medical marijuana law - WJAX-TV

Bot - Cannabis - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 00:58
actionnewsjax.com (US) Court costs Lawsuit: State of Florida ignoring medical marijuana law Rick Scott's administration that contends that state officials are flouting the state's new medical marijuana law. (Tue Nov 21 19:58:53 2017 PST)
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FL: Tribe's marijuana consultant pays fine, court costs - WJAX-TV

Bot - Cannabis - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 00:58
actionnewsjax.com (US) Court costs A cannabis cultivation expert who was prosecuted in South Dakota after working with a Native American tribe trying to open the nation's first marijuana resort will see his drug case dismissed. (Tue Nov 21 19:58:53 2017 PST)
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OH: State gets 370 applications for medical marijuana licenses - Wilmington News Journal

Bot - Cannabis - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 00:48
wnewsj.com (US) Ve received more than 300 applications to operate 60 dispensaries that will sell medical marijuana. (Tue Nov 21 18:48:58 2017 PST)
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