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CANADA: OPINION: Are marijuana and liquor a bad fit?

Drug News Bot - Tue, 01/09/2018 - 00:03
burnabynow.com OPINION: Are marijuana and liquor a bad fit? Will the selling of marijuana in liquor stores result in poor health outcomes. (Tue Jan 09 02:03:53 2018 PST) [$drug_related(100%), $drugwar_propaganda(100%), $addiction(60%), $propaganda_theme2(60%), $propaganda_theme3(75%), $propaganda_theme6(65%), $propaganda_theme7(100%), $illegal_drugs(100%), $drug_reformer(75%), $legalization(100%), $chemicals(75%), $plants(100%), $intoxicant(100%), $opioid(100%), $depressant_intoxicant(75%), $narcotic(100%), $alcohol(75%), $cannabis(100%)]
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CN NS: Developer Hopes Fish Urine Gives Edge In Cannabis Market

MAP Drugnews - Top Stories - Tue, 01/09/2018 - 00:00
Truro Daily News, 06 Jan 2018 - Editor's Note: This is the fourth in a series of stories focusing on people in Nova Scotia who will be delving into the marijuana industry. Fish urine is the secret sauce that will allow some 50,000 cannabis plants to thrive in Liverpool. We'll get to that momentarily. Myrna Gillis, founder and president of Aqualitas, reported recently her company had collected $8.7 million from investors across Canada and the United States.
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Legalization of marijuana more appealing to experienced young users - Xinhua

Google - Cannabis - Mon, 01/08/2018 - 23:58

Legalization of marijuana more appealing to experienced young users
Xinhua
The study, conducted by the Oregon Research Institute (ORI) and published online by Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, examined the influence of legalization of marijuana on young people after the drugs were legalized in Oregon state on the U.S ...

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Kansas GOPer Makes Outrageous Racist Statement About Effects of Marijuana

Alternet - Mon, 01/08/2018 - 22:37
Reefer Madness isn't dead yet.

Kansas state Republican lawmaker resurrected a Jim Crow myth that African Americans are genetically predisposed to handle marijuana more poorly than other races during a speech over the weekend.

As the Garden City Telegram reported, State Rep. Steve Alford (R) told an all-white crowd that marijuana was criminalized during the prohibition era in the 1930’s primarily because of black marijuana use when asked a question by a member of the local Democratic party about potential economic boons from cannabis legalization.

“What you really need to do is go back in the ’30s, when they outlawed all types of drugs in Kansas (and) across the United States,” Alford said. “What was the reason why they did that? One of the reasons why, I hate to say it, was that the African Americans, they were basically users and they basically responded the worst off to those drugs just because of their character makeup, their genetics and that.”

As the Telegram noted in their report, Alford’s comments referenced a belief promoted by marijuana prohibitionist Harry Anslinger, the founding commissioner of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics.

“Under Anslinger’s leadership, the FBN came to be considered responsible for the Marijuana Tax Act of 1937,” the report noted, “regulating cannabis and further taxing it to the ultimate detriment of the hemp industry that was booming at the time.”

“Reefer makes darkies think they’re as good as white men,” Anslinger said once when explaining why marijuana supposedly caused crime and violence. The commissioner also fought for the prohibition of cannabis due to “its effect on the degenerate races,” the Telegram noted.

Watch Rep. Alford’s comments below, via the Garden City Telegram.

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First Nations in Saskatchewan question provincial jurisdiction over marijuana sales - CBC.ca

Google - Cannabis - Mon, 01/08/2018 - 16:27

CBC.ca

First Nations in Saskatchewan question provincial jurisdiction over marijuana sales
CBC.ca
"I would like to see federal regulation on reserve as opposed to being subject to provincial regulation," said Acoose. Sakimay First Nation has four properties in urban centres that Acoose said would be great potential retail locations. According to ...

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Experts Predict 4 Surprising Ways Jeff Sessions' Reefer Madness Pot Decision Could Shake Out in 2018

Alternet - Mon, 01/08/2018 - 16:20
Click here for reuse options! A backlash against the new war on weed could tip the scales to favor federal legalization.

Days after California’s first new adult-use pot shops opened their doors this week, Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced he would allow federal prosecutors to crack down on marijuana operations in states that have legalized marijuana.

His decision overturns an Obama-era Justice Department policy, set in motion by the Cole Memo, that instructed prosecutors to make pot their lowest priority in legal weed states. While the Obama administration’s decision was lauded on both sides of the aisle, the opposite is true of Sessions’ announcement. The backlash so far has been sizeable and bipartisan, splitting the GOP and bolstering Democrats and others who favor legalization.

Speculations abound over how Sessions’ new decision might impact the nascent legal weed industry in California and the thriving, lucrative industries that already exist in the five other states that have legalized pot over the last half decade.

What might this mean for the future of weed in 2018 and beyond? To help sort through this potentially chaotic new territory, we’ve compiled the best observations from experts on some surprising, unintended consequences of Sessions’ announcement.

1. Federal prosecutors might choose to keep their distance from state-legal weed, despite Sessions’ decision.

Tamar Todd, the Drug Policy Alliance’s senior legal affairs director, told the Washington Post it’s not likely U.S. attorneys in legal pot states will start “busting down the doors of marijuana dispensaries” tomorrow. Todd is quoted in the piece explaining how federal attorneys rely on cooperation with state authorities for many drug cases, and that there are plenty of illicit drug operations for them to focus on already.

Todd’s overall message was that it would be unwise on many levels for federal prosecutors to start attacking states’ legal pot industries, and the prosecutors likely know it. Any feds who went after state-legal weed would be isolated, the Post piece notes, because “such a crackdown would produce an outcry from both Democrats and Republicans, in addition to state government and law enforcement officials.”

Colorado’s Democratic governor, John Hickenlooper, also said it’s unlikely Sessions’ decision will send hordes of prosecutors after his state’s incredibly lucrative pot operations—at least not right away.

According to a New York Times piece by Harlie Savage and Jack Healy, Hickenlooper “expressed skepticism that United States attorneys would want to siphon resources from other prosecutions so they could close a marijuana dispensary operating under state regulations.”

Colorado’s Republican Senator Cory Gardner, chair of NRSC, put an ultimatum out to Sessions in response to his pot decision:

“I will be putting a hold on every single nomination from the Department of Justice until Attorney General Jeff Sessions lives up to the commitment he made to me in my pre-confirmation meeting with him. The conversation we had that was specifically about this issue of states’ rights in Colorado. Until he lives up to that commitment, I’ll be holding up all nominations of the Department of Justice,” Gardner said. “The people of Colorado deserve answers. The people of Colorado deserve to be respected.”

2. California will likely join forces with other pro-pot states to stand up for the weed industry.

The states where pot is legal have heavy incentive to protect their pot businesses, because, as the industry has already proven, legalization brings with it staggering tax revenues, cash flow, jobs and other benefits. California alone is set to collect $1 billion in taxes this year via retail cannabis.

California Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom has vowed to encourage cooperation between states with legal cannabis laws, and said to the New York Times: “This brings states together around issues of freedom, individual liberty, states’ rights... all of the principles that transcend red and blue.”

Newsom said in a separate statement, “Today, Jeff Sessions and the Trump administration destructively doubled down on the failed, costly and racially discriminatory policy of marijuana criminalization, trampling on the will” of voters.

California may be poised to designate itself a “sanctuary state” for pot, following the model of its designation as a sanctuary state for immigrants against deportation. In response to Sessions announcement, Assemblyman Reggie Jones-Sawyer (D-Los Angeles) has redrafted an earlier proposal of Assembly Bill 1578, which would prevent state and local agencies from assisting federal drug enforcement agencies in targeting the state’s cannabis industry without a federal court order.

Jones-Sawyer said in a statement to the Sacramento Bee:

“The impacts of this ill-conceived and poorly executed war [on marijuana] are still being felt by communities of color across the state. The last time California supported the federal government’s efforts, families were torn apart and critical state resources were used to incarcerate more black and brown people than ever before in the history of our state.”

California State Attorney General Xavier Becerra has been reaching out to the Department of Justice on the issue, and told Sacramento Bee he has not ruled out a lawsuit to “protect the state’s laws.”

“We’ll do whatever we must to make sure that California’s laws are obeyed,” Becerra said.

Authorities in Colorado, Oregon, Washington and other states with cannabis legalization laws have also made statements to indicate they will stand by voters and protect their in-state marijuana industries.

3. More skittish cannabis investors might pull out, and a pot stock sell-off has already begun. But many cannabis investors are activists for the industry who were there prior to the Cole Memo, and they're not going anywhere.

The cannabis investment firm Poseidon Asset Management was managing investments in pot more than six months before the Cole Memo came out in 2013. Attorney Cristina Buccola, whose practice focuses on the pot industry, says in a Forbes article that Sessions’ memo has not impacted her clients. “This is not causing [investors] to turn away from these investment opportunities,” she told Forbes. “None of the projects have been put on pause.”

Forbes also quotes an email from Ryan Ansin—a cannabis investor, president of the Family Office Association and managing director of Revolutionary Clinics—noting that Sessions’ memo doesn’t impact the laws. Pot was already federally illegal, and continues to be federally illegal, “and informed investors know that,” Ansin says.

4.  The political, economic and social effect of Sessions' decision might boost the Dems and tip the scales in Congress to legalize pot at the federal level.

A growing majority of Americans think pot should be legal in some form; 61 percent think it should be legal for adult use, according to the most recent Pew Research Center polling, out this week.

Even Republicans hate Sessions’ pot announcement, and the GOP is split apart in its wake. This is one of many reasons Paul Waldman gives in his Washington Post article, “Why Jeff Sessions’s marijuana crackdown is going to make legalization more likely," arguing that the backlash to Sessions’ decision could spell doom for Republicans and prohibitionists. "A backlash could help more Democrats get elected, and push elected Democrats to more unambiguously support legalization,” he writes.

Public opinion is so far away from backing Sessions and the Trump administration’s attempt at reversing marijuana legalization progress that Republicans are in an “awkward position,” Waldman notes. Many have "released outraged statements condemning the decision, but it might not be enough to persuade voters not to punish President Trump by voting them out. ”

In Politico, James Higdon quotes California Republican Dana Rohrabacher in a conference call with five members of the Congressional Cannabis Caucus, arguing that the Sessions announcement is likely to have an inverse effect of turning a states issue into a national priority.

“It’s a big plus for our efforts that the federal government is now aware that our constituents have been alerted,” Rohrabacher said. "We can be confident we can win this fight, because this is a freedom issue.”

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Cramer: Marijuana, bitcoin and Micron are all speculative investments - CNBC

Google - Cannabis - Mon, 01/08/2018 - 15:32

CNBC

Cramer: Marijuana, bitcoin and Micron are all speculative investments
CNBC
Jim Cramer gauged the speculative potential of the cannabis, cryptocurrency and chipmaking markets for individual investors.

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Ottawa urged to consider environmental impacts of legal marijuana - CTV News

Google - Cannabis - Mon, 01/08/2018 - 14:47

CTV News

Ottawa urged to consider environmental impacts of legal marijuana
CTV News
VANCOUVER -- Dan Sutton always assumed cannabis had to be grown indoors. The former technology professional was new to the marijuana industry in 2012 when he founded Tantalus Labs. The stereotypical image of a large industrial warehouse, with pot ...
California's legal marijuana sales could hit a distribution roadblockThe Cannabist

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Cannabis Insiders Share 2018 Industry Wishes - Forbes

Google - Cannabis - Mon, 01/08/2018 - 14:26

Forbes

Cannabis Insiders Share 2018 Industry Wishes
Forbes
2018 is shaping up to be a wild year for cannabis and it's only January. As California rolled out recreational sales last week, the Justice Department reversed rules that protect legal pot businesses from federal intervention. Weed - both recreational ...

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California Pulls Drugged-Driving Ad Critics Said Promoted Cannabis - Leafly

Google - Cannabis - Mon, 01/08/2018 - 11:55

Leafly

California Pulls Drugged-Driving Ad Critics Said Promoted Cannabis
Leafly
California Pulls Drugged-Driving Ad Critics Said Promoted Cannabis. The Associated Press. January 8, 2018. A medical marijuana dispensary leaves its lights on after hours on in Los Angeles in this 2010 file photo. California is pulling ads aimed at ...
Sessions' marijuana crackdown is 'a dangerous step backwards'CNBC
Chart: Marijuana stocks stumble, then rebound after Sessions announcementMarijuana Business Daily
Jeff Sessions' marijuana move will backfireCNN
The Cannabist -The Hill (blog) -PBS NewsHour -Department of Justice
all 755 news articles »
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California Just Might Declare Itself a 'Sanctuary State' for Legal Weed

Alternet - Mon, 01/08/2018 - 10:44
A bill in Sacramento would bar state and local law enforcement agencies from cooperating with the feds on pot busts.

SACRAMENTO (CN) — A California lawmaker is aiming to protect the state’s budding marijuana industry by barring law enforcement agencies from cooperating with federal drug agencies on pot busts.

Assemblyman Reggie Jones-Sawyer, D-Los Angeles, says his bill “protects the will of California voters,” who overwhelmingly legalized marijuana in 2016.

His proposal, which would create a so-called sanctuary pot state, came less than a week after recreational pot became legal in California, and was sparked by Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ announcement of a federal policy shift on enforcement of marijuana laws.

Jones-Sawyer said California voters made it clear they don’t want Sessions’ “cannabis-centric war on drugs” waged in the Golden State.

“The intent of Assembly Bill 1578 is to provide state agencies with the protection they need to uphold state laws without federal interference,” Jones-Sawyer said in a statement. “What Jeff Sessions is proposing is not a return to ‘Rule of Law’ as he claims; instead he is taking away access to cannabis for children with chronic diseases, cancer patients, seniors and veterans.”

The measure would prevent local and state law enforcement agencies from assisting federal authorities on marijuana activities that are legal under California law, without a court order. Jones-Sawyer’s bill would also bar state agencies from providing the federal government with information on licensed marijuana growers and retailers.

The bill is based on a 2017 California law that restricts state law enforcement agencies from cooperating with federal immigration agencies. Sessions has called California’s immigration sanctuary bill a “threat to public safety.”

This is the second time around for AB 1578, which stalled in the Legislature in August last year. The Assembly narrowly approved Jones-Sawyer’s pot bill 41-33 but it never made it to a vote in the Senate. The American Civil Liberties Union and a host of labor unions supported the bill, which was opposed by California law enforcement agencies.

Jones-Sawyer, a second-term assemblyman and former Los Angeles deputy mayor said the decades-long war on drugs has had a disparate impact on minority communities and that his bill will protect Californians from the federal government’s outdated drug laws.

“The last time California supported the federal government’s efforts, families were torn apart and critical state resources were used to incarcerate more black and brown people than ever before in the history of our state,” Jones-Sawyer said.

 

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U.S. Asks Targets of Trump Attacks--U.N., China, Mexico--to Help With Opioid Crisis

Alternet - Mon, 01/08/2018 - 10:31
Washington has asked the U.N. to help declare fentanyl illegal in U.S. and China, as White House works with Mexico to address the drug’s spread.

While Donald Trump criticizes and argues with the United Nations, Mexico, and China over embassies, walls and trade deals, his administration is relying upon them as he attempts to combat the opioid epidemic.

The president declared the opioid crisis a public health emergency last year, with most recent government estimates suggesting the more than 64,000 fatal overdoses in 2016 outnumber the total number of American deaths in the Vietnam war.

Richard Baum, acting director of the White House’s Office of National Drug Control Policy, told the Guardian that the US had requested the UN help declare fentanyl – an opioid at the heart of the crisis in the US – illegal in both the US and China.

The US claims fentanyl manufactured in China – available for purchase online or imported into the US via established trafficking routes – contributes to the epidemic currently facing the country. A UN effort to outlaw the drug would empower international law enforcement to stem the flow across borders.

“It creates a better environment if [fentanyl] is illegal in the US and it’s illegal in China,” said Baum. “So we’re cooperating. We are trading information about what’s happening. They are banning substances [and] we are. We’re working together at the UN.”

The importance of the UN in coordinating international cooperation on an American drug problem underlines the complex relationship the Trump administration has with the world body – as well as countries it needs to partner with to face down critical domestic issues.

Trump is a strong critic of the UN, saying after his 2016 election that it was “just a club for people to get together, talk, and have a good time”. He also slammed the general assembly’s rebuke of his plan to move the US embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem last year.

But Baum, Trump’s top adviser on drug control issues, said global cooperation was key to addressing the US opioid epidemic and must be maintained.

“When the US asked China for help on some of these cases, they have told us that it’s much better for them if [a drug] is something that is illegal in China,” he said. “I always want more cooperation, faster action, but when we put in requests and we’ve documented things that are sourced from China, they’re acting on it.”

Baum said Mexican drug cartels were also importing fentanyl from China and mixing it with heroin trafficked into the US. Fentanyl is also imported to Mexicofrom China, repackaged as pills, and shipped into the US.

“It is the same organizations, the Mexican trafficking organizations, that are moving a lot of product into the US containing fentanyl,” Baum said.

“We have a really positive, collaborative relationship with Mexico. We’re working very closely with them. We have our shared border, and that doesn’t change. The cartels based in Mexico are a hugely difficult and complicated problem and we need to continue to work together with our Mexican colleagues in addressing that problem.”

Yet the necessity of a positive relationship with Mexico on drug control is contradicted by Trump’s continuing public statements about his country’s southern neighbor. A campaign declaration that Mexicans are “bringing drugs, they’re bringing crime, they’re rapists” and demands for Mexico to pay for a border wall contributed to a low in relations when Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto cancelled a 2017 state visit. Immigration and trade issues are also contentious.

Baum, however, said a longstanding relationship between law enforcement and on-the-ground diplomatic efforts by the US embassy in Mexico City overcome top-level tension between the countries.

“We understand the blood and treasure the Mexican government has spent trying to address the drug cartels,” Baum said. “We understand it’s an enormous problem and challenge for Mexico. They are working very hard. They’ve lost a lot of good people trying to address the problem. It’s a relationship based on professional law enforcement people working together to address a shared problem.”

Trump’s 2016 national health emergency declaration was criticized for freeing up just $57,000 in federal funds but Baum said the president had proposed a $28.7bn overall federal drug budget – including $10.8bn for drug treatment programs for 2018.

“We’re doing more against drugs than we ever have before but it’s not enough,” Baum said.

 

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Global marijuana company in Smiths Falls, Ont., seeks a retail pot store - CBC.ca

Google - Cannabis - Mon, 01/08/2018 - 10:29

CBC.ca

Global marijuana company in Smiths Falls, Ont., seeks a retail pot store
CBC.ca
The law, which passed in December, says the new provincial pot retailer can enter into agreements with people or entities who can sell cannabis "as an agent" of the government agency, and sell it on behalf of the government corporation. The mayor of ...

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Some patients will face a choice: medical marijuana or their gun - Baltimore Sun

Google - Cannabis - Mon, 01/08/2018 - 02:01

Baltimore Sun

Some patients will face a choice: medical marijuana or their gun
Baltimore Sun
The Maryland State Police, who oversee gun ownership in the state, ask prospective gun buyers if they have a medical marijuana card. By law, buyers must allow the state health department to disclose whether they have applied for a card. Gun advocates ...

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OR: Customs officers seize $22M in cocaine hidden in furniture - KPTV - FOX 12

Drug News Bot - Mon, 01/08/2018 - 00:58
kptv.com (US) Federal customs officials in Philadelphia say they recently discovered more than 700 pounds of cocaine hidden inside bedroom furniture and kitchen cabinets that were shipped from Puerto Rico. (Mon Jan 08 21:58:23 2018 PST) [$drug_related(100%), $drugwar_propaganda(80%), $propaganda_theme2(80%), $use_is_abuse(60%), $propaganda_theme4(60%), $propaganda_theme5(80%), $illegal_drugs(100%), $drugs(95%), $chemicals(100%), $euphoric_stimulant(100%), $stimulant(100%), $cocaine(100%), $various_drugs(95%), $various_illegal_drugs(100%), $incarceration(100%), $youth(80%), $aggrandizement(100%), $msm(100%), $mockingbird(100%), $assoc_press(100%)]
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OR: Roseburg Entertainment - News, Weather, Sports, Breaking News - KPIC

Drug News Bot - Mon, 01/08/2018 - 00:56
kpic.com (US) Roseanne Barr backs Trump in life, on sitcom ... (Mon Jan 08 21:56:49 2018 PST) [$drug_related(100%), $drugwar_propaganda(60%), $propaganda_theme3(60%), $drug_reformer(100%), $roseanne_barr(100%), $school(100%), $msm(100%), $mockingbird(100%)]
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OR: It's Unclear How Oregon Could Block Federal Cannabis Crackdown - Jefferson Public Radio

Bot - Cannabis - Mon, 01/08/2018 - 00:51
ijpr.org (US) It's Unclear How Oregon Could Block Federal Cannabis Crackdown ! Jefferson Public Radio It's Unclear How Oregon Could Block Federal Cannabis Crackdown Several legal observers say that there are limited ways for Oregon officials to defend state-regulated cannabis businesses in the courts in light of changes to federal guidance on enforcement of theB drug. (Mon Jan 08 21:51:59 2018 PST)
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OR: It's Unclear How Oregon Could Block Federal Cannabis Crackdown - Jefferson Public Radio

Drug News Bot - Mon, 01/08/2018 - 00:51
ijpr.org (US) It's Unclear How Oregon Could Block Federal Cannabis Crackdown ! Jefferson Public Radio It's Unclear How Oregon Could Block Federal Cannabis Crackdown Several legal observers say that there are limited ways for Oregon officials to defend state-regulated cannabis businesses in the courts in light of changes to federal guidance on enforcement of theB drug. (Mon Jan 08 21:51:59 2018 PST) [$drug_related(100%), $drugwar_propaganda(50%), $propaganda_theme3(50%), $illegal_drugs(100%), $drugs(90%), $drug_law(100%), $govt_prohib_other(100%), $plants(100%), $intoxicant(100%), $cannabis(100%), $cannabis_industry(85%), $various_drugs(90%), $various_illegal_drugs(80%), $legalism(50%), $aggrandizement(100%)]
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