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Ex-commissioner Stern: NBA should change policy on marijuana - Sportsnet.ca

Google - Cannabis - Wed, 10/25/2017 - 15:20

Sportsnet.ca

Ex-commissioner Stern: NBA should change policy on marijuana
Sportsnet.ca
... NBA commissioner David Stern spoke with former NBA player Al Harrington in a mini documentary posted Wednesday called “The Concept of Cannabis” from the UNINTERRUPTED where the two addressed the topic of athletes using medical marijuana.
Former Commissioner David Stern: Medical marijuana should be removed from banned listNBA.com
Ex-NBA commissioner David Stern says marijuana should no longer be bannedThe Guardian
Imagine the NBA possibilities with legal marijuana: David SternNew York Post
ESPN -CBSSports.com -YouTube -Uninterrupted
all 58 news articles »
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New Poll Shows Record-Breaking Support for Marijuana Legalization

Alternet - Wed, 10/25/2017 - 12:58
Click here for reuse options! 64% of Americans are in favor.

A new Gallup poll shows record-breaking support for ending marijuana prohibition, with 64% of Americans now in favor of legalizing marijuana.

Support for marijuana legalization has steadily increased over the nearly half century that Gallup has been polling on this issue. Majorities of Americans across the political spectrum now believe that marijuana should be made legal, with 51% of Republicans, 72% of Democrats, and 67% of Independents supporting legalization. Simultaneously, President Trump’s approval ratings are nearing an all-time low.

“Marijuana legalization is far more popular than Jeff Sessions or Donald Trump and will survive them both,” said Maria McFarland Sánchez-Moreno, executive director of the Drug Policy Alliance. “Instead of wasting limited law enforcement resources trying to stop successful state-level legalization initiatives, US officials should listen to the clear, bipartisan message the public is sending them, and support federal marijuana reform as well.”  

In 2012, voters in Colorado and Washington approved the first two U.S. state laws legalizing marijuana for adults 21 years of age and older. In 2014, voters approved legalization measures in Alaska, Oregon, and Washington, D.C. In 2016, voters in California, Maine, Massachusetts and Nevada doubled the number of states that legally regulate marijuana, bringing the total to eight. As more and more states legalize, popular support for ending marijuana prohibition continues to climb. The number of Americans in favor of legalizing marijuana has increased 14% since 2011, the year before Washington and Colorado first legalized marijuana.

This support is likely due to the success of current state marijuana legalization programs. A Drug Policy Alliance report found that Colorado, Washington, Alaska and Oregon have benefitted from a dramatic decrease in marijuana arrests and convictions, as well as increased tax revenues, since the adult possession of marijuana became legal.  At the same time, these states did not experience increases in youth marijuana use or traffic fatalities.

With support for marijuana legalization so strong, marijuana law reform advocates have a unique opportunity to not merely legalize marijuana but to also begin to repair the harms of marijuana prohibition. It is imperative that new marijuana legalization strategies follow and build upon California’s Proposition 64: The Adult Use of Marijuana Act.

Prop 64’s cutting edge provisions include decriminalizing marijuana use for youth; across-the-board retroactive sentencing reforms for marijuana offenses; removing barriers to the marijuana industry for persons with felony convictions; reinvesting marijuana revenues into communities most negatively impacted by marijuana enforcement; restoring the environment and watershed; protecting small businesses and farmers. In addition, Prop 64 establishes a comprehensive, strictly-controlled system to tax and regulate businesses to produce and distribute marijuana in a legal market.

Senator Cory Booker (D-NJ) recently introduced the Marijuana Justice Act, a bill modeled on Prop. 64 that ends federal marijuana prohibition and centers communities most devastated by the war on drugs.

“The question is no longer whether we should legalize marijuana, but rather how we should do it,” added McFarland Sánchez-Moreno. “The Marijuana Justice Act would legalize marijuana the right way, by not only stopping the ongoing harms of prohibition, but also beginning to address the devastation that marijuana prohibition has wrought, particularly among communities of color.”

This piece first appeared on the Drug Policy Alliance Blog 

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Ex-policewoman's cannabis use to relieve pain from MS - BBC News

Google - Cannabis - Wed, 10/25/2017 - 11:35

BBC News

Ex-policewoman's cannabis use to relieve pain from MS
BBC News
Meet Sue Cox: Former police officer, grandmother.... and committed cannabis user. The 64-year-old said the devastating effects of multiple sclerosis have left her dependent on the illegal drug for the pain relief she feels it gives her. Mrs Cox, from ...

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Poll: Majority of Republicans support marijuana legalization - CNN

Google - Cannabis - Wed, 10/25/2017 - 10:48

CNN

Poll: Majority of Republicans support marijuana legalization
CNN
The increase in legalization support comes as Attorney General Jeff Sessions, a Republican who has frequently criticized the use of marijuana, hasn't yet announced whether he'll continue to abide by more lenient Obama-era guidance and avoid enforcing ...
Poll: Legal Marijuana Support At Record High In USForbes
A Record High 64% of Americans Say Cannabis Should be LegalLeafly
Support for marijuana legalization hits new all-time high (get it?)Vox
HuffPost -CBC.ca -The Globe and Mail -Gallup News
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America's Opioid Crisis: How Prescription Drugs Sparked a National Trauma

Alternet - Wed, 10/25/2017 - 10:16
Aggressive marketing of painkillers derived from opium led to a new generation of addicts and more fatal overdoses than car crashes and guns combined.

The trips to resorts in the sun traps of Florida, Arizona and California were a great chance for medics to network, take a break from patients and learn about new treatments. There were even freebies – fishing hats, cuddly toys to take back for the kids, music CDs. And the visits were all expenses paid.

But such events laid the groundwork for a national crisis.

From 1996 to 2001, American drug giant Purdue Pharma held more than 40 national “pain management symposia” at picturesque locations, hosting thousands of American doctors, nurses and pharmacists.

The healthcare professionals had been specially invited, whisked to the conferences to be drilled on promotional material about the firm’s new star drug, OxyContin, and recruited as advocates, the US government later documented.

But OxyContin was to become ground zero in an opioid crisis that has now engulfed the United States.

The pill comprises oxycodone, a semi-synthetic opioid loosely related to morphine and originally based on elements of the opium poppy. Such strong painkillers were traditionally used to ease cancer pain, but beginning in the mid-1990s, pills based on oxycodone and the similar compound hydrocodone began being branded and aggressively marketed for chronic pain instead – a nagging back injury from manual labor or a car accident, for example.

From 1996 to 2002, Purdue more than doubled its sales force and distributed coupons so doctors could let patients try a 30-day free supply of these highly addictive drugs.

Prescriptions issued for OxyContin in the US increased tenfold over those six years, from 670,000 a year to more than six million. A bulletin from the American Public Health Association in 2009, reviewing the rise of prescription opioids, is titled “The promotion and marketing of OxyContin: commercial triumph, public health tragedy”. The document also asserted that Purdue had played down the risks of addiction. In a landmark case, the company was fined more than $600m in 2007 for misleading the public, but it was making billions – at the time the only company making this kind of money from high-strength opioids.

By 2002 prescription opioids were killing 5,000 people a year in America and that number tripled over the following decade.

Coast to coast

One of the key regions of the US affected early in the crisis was central Appalachia, an area covering much of West Virginia and eastern Kentucky known for small towns, rolling hills and physically taxing industries, including coalmining, agriculture and lumber production. Here, the proliferation of opioids encouraged abuse and the pills came to be known as “hillbilly heroin”.

Even taken exactly as prescribed, they were addictive, blocking pain (without treating its cause) and reducing stress. But people also began grinding them up to snort or inject for a potent high.

“At the time, it wasn’t understood how addicting these prescription pain medications were,” Michelle Lofwall, associate professor at the Center on Drug and Alcohol Research at the University of Kentucky School of Medicine told the Guardian in a 2014 report. “But they really hurt people here and across the nation.”

In the new millennium, addiction spread coast to coast.

And as use of the drugs spread, the distribution of pills spilled out from primary-care doctors’ offices and hospitals to illegal deals on street corners. They were also sold in vast quantities through barely regulated “pain treatment centers” in places such as Florida, which became known as “pill mills”. People with spurious pain complaints flocked to feed their own dependency or sell the pills on.

In 2003, rightwing media blowhard Rush Limbaugh admitted he was hooked on opioids. Actor Heath Ledger had prescription opioids in his system, along with a cocktail of sedatives, when he was found dead in New York in 2008 at 28.

In 2011 the US government reported that deaths from prescription opioid overdoses had overtaken combined fatalities from heroin and cocaine.

By 2012, sales of prescription opioids were grossing $11bn in the US annually and, with insufficient regulatory oversight, causing 15,000 fatal overdoses.

The street-drug epidemic of crack in the 80s and early 90s wrought particular havoc among low-income, urban African Americans, while the sordid blight of backyard-cooked methamphetamine was at its height among more rural, white populations in the 90s and early 21st century.

In contrast, the opioid crisis rippled out from neat pharmacy counters across broader income and geographical bands. The typical addict was most likely to be white, male and middle-aged, but the drug has a wide grip.

Gradually, the authorities began shutting down pill mills and warning health professionals and the public that opioids were far from a magic bullet.

But for many, the squeezing of supply, combined with a chronic lack of resourcesto treat addiction, didn’t help them quit, it made them desperate. A new, even darker chapter unfolded: the resurgence of street heroin and the emergence of a treacherous street-drug version of its synthetic cousin, fentanyl.

Fast forward to today and America is losing almost 1,000 people a week to drug overdoses. Two-thirds of those are opioid fatalities – with the pill problem still pervasive, but with a rising number of heroin and fentanyl deaths.

In 2015, a quarter of drug overdose deaths involved heroin, compared with 8% in 2010.

The death rates are highest in West Virginia, New Hampshire, Kentucky and Ohio, but the opioid epidemic has spread nationwide, as this map shows.

In 2014, renowned actor Philip Seymour Hoffman died of a heroin overdose in New York, after 23 years of sobriety. Last year Prince died when he overdosed on pills containing fentanyl – and the world suddenly became familiar with this synthetic narcotic being milled in Mexico from Chinese ingredients and rushedinto the US drug market.

On Thursday Donald Trump is expected to declare the opioid crisis to be a “national emergency”.

Other developed countries, including the UK, have been grappling with a rise in opioid addiction, too, although Britain’s public health system means the issue of massive over-prescription is less acute.

But the US is the epicentre and the origin of the crisis, consuming more than 80% of global opioid pills even though it has less than 5% of the world’s population and no monopoly on pain.

National data has stated that the volume of opioid pills prescribed in the US since 1999 has quadrupled, and so has the number of opioid overdoses.

But “there has not been an overall change in the amount of pain Americans have reported in that period”, the government reported.

142 fatal overdoses a day

Overdoses killed more people in the US in 2015 than car crashes and gun deaths combined. The daily death toll is 142 fatal overdoses, 91 of them from opioids, adding up to almost 52,000 drug overdose deaths in 2015.

Declaring a national state of emergency over opioids will focus fresh attentionand increase government powers to cut red tape and release funding to expand treatment. Action such as providing all police departments and other first responders with the overdose antidote naloxone, which helps save lives, is being urged.

But if Trump succeeds in his determination to repeal the Obama administration’s Affordable Care Act, which brought health insurance to millions more Americans, it will hinder those seeking affordable treatment programs.

And in recent public pronouncements, the president appears to be stuck in the failed 80s mentality of “Just say No” to drugs, and in blaming individuals for becoming dependent on dangerous pills their doctors told them were safe.

He called for drug prosecutions to increase, and said: “The best way to prevent drug addiction and overdose is to prevent people from abusing drugs in the first place.” He emphasized the administration’s efforts to stop the flow of drugs over the Mexico-US border, but did not mention the pharmaceutical companies producing opioids within the US.

Although Trump said Congress was too beholden to the pharmaceutical companies, which shower Washington with donations and persuasive lobbyists, his declaration embarrassingly coincided with news that the man who was poised to be his new national drug policy “czar” had to withdraw from consideration because he had sponsored legislation that hindered attempts to crack down on opioids.

“In 2015, the amount of opioids prescribed in the US was enough for every American to be medicated around the clock for three weeks,” warned a recent draft report by a commission on the crisis led by the combative New Jersey governor, Chris Christie.

It concluded: “Our citizens are dying. We must act.”

 

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Cannabis and the Common Cold: Does It Help or Hurt?

Alternet - Wed, 10/25/2017 - 10:11
As the fall season slowly begins fading into the winter months, an influx in cool weather is a sure harbinger for cold and flu season.

The potential medical applications of cannabis seem boundless—there are an array of terminal and debilitating illnesses that may, in time, be successfully remedied with the plant. However, for those cannabis users that aren’t treating life threatening diseases and disorders, how does medical marijuana fit into a normal health regiment? More specifically, what sort of role, if any, does cannabis play when it comes to dealing with the common cold and flu?

As the fall season slowly begins fading into the winter months, an influx in cool weather is a sure harbinger for cold and flu season. Therefore, the marijuana using population should be conscious of how their consumption should be regimented during this time.

Regular Marijuana Use While Sick

For many marijuana advocates and aficionados today, “regular cannabis use” can range from several times a day to a few times a week. That being said, how regular marijuana consumption will affect one’s health while sick depends largely on how the herb is consumed and in what volume. For example, if a heavy cannabis smoker is exacerbated with a sore throat and respiratory funk, it’s not a good idea to continue with their standard smoking regiment. Moreover, smoking cannabis while experiencing the on-comings of a sore throat can very well turn a minor physical impediment into a full-fledged affliction. In a similar vein, regular edibles consumption should be curbed while experiencing stomach issues, both minor and major.

With the aforementioned notions in mind, during cold and flu season people should structure their cannabis intake around personal thresholds and physical markers. Also, remember that the passing of a pipe or joint around a large group of people is a great way to spread, or contract, a viral infection.

Potential Medicinal Benefits of Cannabis

While a majority of media attention surrounding medical marijuana has to do with terminal epidemics like cancer and aids, cannabis actually has an array of applications for less severe illnesses. To this end, research into potential medical applications of cannabis concerning common sicknesses presented some promising findings. Here are some ways in which medical marijuana can be utilized during cold and flu season:

  • The pain nullifying properties of THC can be beneficial for those suffering from the “aches” of the common cold—aiding in both sleep in relaxation during these tough times.
  • CBD has some serious anti-viral applications; some doctor’s feel that regular CBD consumption can actually help fight-off the common cold and flu.
  • An individual’s endocannabinoid system can easily become depleted while sick—this occurs as one’s body consistently defends itself against a virus. Marijuana consumption, including both THC and CBD rich strains, can help replenish these endogenous cannabinoids that are depleted during sickness. By refreshing the endocannabinoid system, people can potentially heal from sickness more efficiently.
  • Marijuana can act as an “anti-inflammatory,” helping to open up air ways and passages in the human body otherwise inhibited by being sick.

Judging by these rather astonishing findings, people may be well-advised to add cannabis to their health routine during cold and flu season—in a balanced, logical, and responsible fashion. Look out chicken soup, weed is here to stay.

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Halifax Councillor Calls Out 'Marijuana' as a Racist Term - VICE

Google - Cannabis - Wed, 10/25/2017 - 09:09

VICE

Halifax Councillor Calls Out 'Marijuana' as a Racist Term
VICE
That councillor, Shawn Cleary, chairs a committee dealing with implementing cannabis regulation within Nova Scotia as legalization approaches in July 2018. "It was intentional to demonize the marginalized folks they didn't like very much to make white ...
Former US president George HW Bush apologizes after actress claims he 'sexually assaulted' her from his ...Daily Mail
Second Woman: George HW Bush Groped MeDeadspin

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Much ado about marijuana: BC's public survey on legalization ends in one week - Vancouver Sun

Google - Cannabis - Wed, 10/25/2017 - 08:59

Vancouver Sun

Much ado about marijuana: BC's public survey on legalization ends in one week
Vancouver Sun
The online survey asks British Columbians to share their thoughts on what the age and personal possession limits should be, whether public consumption and personal growing should be allowed, how and were cannabis should be sold and more.
One week left to share views on marijuana rules in BCCTV Vancouver Island

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Expert Marsha Rosenbaum on How to Educate Young People About Drugs

Alternet - Wed, 10/25/2017 - 08:11
Click here for reuse options! It's time for a curriculum grounded in science and harm reduction.

We're back with a new episode of DPA's podcast, Drugs & Stuff!

We pulled aside a handful of experts to talk with us during the Drug Policy Alliance's 2017 International Drug Policy Reform Conference in Atlanta a couple weeks ago, and we'll be rolling out those conversations over the next few weeks.

First up we have Marsha Rosenbaum, who sat down to talk with us about what drug education should look like for young people, and her experience as a mother, researcher and drug policy reformer trying to get schools to implement a curriculum grounded in science and harm reduction.

Marsha founded DPA's San Francisco office and is the author of the prominent education booklet, "Safety First: A Reality-Based Approach to Teens and Drugs." From 1977 to 1995 she was the principal investigator on National Institute on Drug Abuse-funded studies of heroin addiction, methadone maintenance treatment, MDMA (Ecstasy), cocaine, and drug use during pregnancy. She is the author of three books, four education booklets, as well as numerous scholarly articles about drug use, addiction, women, treatment, and drug policy

 

New episode!! Marsha Rosenbaum Talks About What Drug Education Should Look Like For Young People https://t.co/1kfRwWLwLM #drugsandstuff pic.twitter.com/7npu6kkxtu

— Drugs & Stuff (@drugsnstuffDPA) October 25, 2017

 

We hope you enjoy this episode! Marsha is a delight to listen to. Don't forget to follow us on Twitter at @drugsnstuffDPA and tell your friends to subscribe to Drugs & Stuff!

This piece originally appeared on the Drug Policy Alliance blog.

 

 

 

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Imperial Tobacco wants the government to treat cigarettes and ... - Straight.com

Google - Cannabis - Wed, 10/25/2017 - 08:02

Straight.com

Imperial Tobacco wants the government to treat cigarettes and ...
Straight.com
One is known to cause cancer and the other is used to help treat it, so why argue that tobacco and weed should be treated as equals when it comes to public ...
Ottawa's out to beat the black market on marijuana. Why not tobacco ...Financial Post

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NB unveils plans for Crown-run marijuana stores, plus home delivery - CTV News

Google - Cannabis - Wed, 10/25/2017 - 06:17

CBC.ca

NB unveils plans for Crown-run marijuana stores, plus home delivery
CTV News
Just as in wine and scotch, there's a tasting wheel," said Agnew, who currently uses medicinal marijuana himself. Last month, Ontario announced it plans to set the minimum age at 19 and sell cannabis through government-run outlets. Earlier this month ...
NB Liquor to sell recreational cannabis in stand-alone pot stores ...CBC.ca
NB to make cannabis available via Liquor subsidiary, onlineBNN

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Marijuana compounds made in GM yeast could help epilepsy - New Scientist

Google - Cannabis - Wed, 10/25/2017 - 04:08

New Scientist

Marijuana compounds made in GM yeast could help epilepsy
New Scientist
It has added the chunk of cannabis DNA that codes for CBDV into yeast DNA, which turns the yeast into CBDV production plants. This allows for rapid, large-scale CBDV creation with none of the concerns around growing marijuana. “It can be very ...

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Kontakt

Bot - Cannabis - Wed, 10/25/2017 - 00:36
drugnews.nu (Europe) Nej, Sverige ska inte legalisera cannabis" Nya Zeeland ska folkomrC6sta om cannabis "Nej, Sverige ska inte legalisera cannabis" Sven ... (Wed Oct 25 23:36:14 2017 PDT)
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Drugnews - NyhetsbyrA%n som tar tempen pA% drogkampen

Bot - Cannabis - Wed, 10/25/2017 - 00:36
drugnews.nu (Europe) Nej, Sverige ska inte legalisera cannabis" WFAD Nya Zeeland ska folkomrC6sta om cannabis "Nej, Sverige ska inte legalisera cannabis" Nya Zeeland ska folkomrC6sta om cannabis WELLINGTON Nya Zeelands nya premiC$rminister Jacinda Arder... (Wed Oct 25 23:36:14 2017 PDT)
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Kontakt

Drug News Bot - Wed, 10/25/2017 - 00:36
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Drugnews - NyhetsbyrA%n som tar tempen pA% drogkampen

Drug News Bot - Wed, 10/25/2017 - 00:36
drugnews.nu (Europe) Nej, Sverige ska inte legalisera cannabis" WFAD Nya Zeeland ska folkomrC6sta om cannabis "Nej, Sverige ska inte legalisera cannabis" Nya Zeeland ska folkomrC6sta om cannabis WELLINGTON Nya Zeelands nya premiC$rminister Jacinda Arder... (Wed Oct 25 23:36:14 2017 PDT) [$drug_related(100%), $drugwar_propaganda(80%), $propaganda_theme1(80%), $propaganda_theme2(60%), $use_is_abuse(75%), $propaganda_theme4(75%), $dissent_attacked(60%), $propaganda_theme8(60%), $illegal_drugs(100%), $drugs(95%), $drug_ngo(50%), $prohibitionist(95%), $government_prohib(66%), $prohibition_agency(66%), $prohibitionist_ngo(50%), $chemicals(100%), $plants(100%), $pharms(100%), $euphoric_depressant(100%), $analgesic(100%), $non_opiate_synthetic_analgesic(100%), $anesthetic(100%), $intoxicant(100%), $opioid(100%), $narcotic(100%), $opiate(100%), $heroin(100%), $cannabis(100%), $fentanyl(100%), $tramadol(100%), $various_drugs(95%)]
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OR: Willamette Week -- Portland News, Movies, Music, Restaurants, Arts - Willamette Week

Bot - Cannabis - Wed, 10/25/2017 - 00:27
wweek.com (US) July 10 Is Now a Day Dedicated to Dabs The number 710. (Wed Oct 25 22:27:17 2017 PDT)
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OR: July 10 Is Now a Day Dedicated to Dabs - Willamette Week

Bot - Cannabis - Wed, 10/25/2017 - 00:27
wweek.com (US) July 10 Is Now a Day Dedicated to Dabs - Willamette Week July 10 Is Now a Day Dedicated to Dabs Nothing suspicious or marijuana-related or subversive to see here. (Wed Oct 25 22:27:17 2017 PDT)
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OR: Willamette Week -- Portland News, Movies, Music, Restaurants, Arts - Willamette Week

Bot - Cannabis - Wed, 10/25/2017 - 00:27
wweek.com (US) Andrew Jones Says He Will Dominate the Hottest Slice of the Marijuana Marketb But a Former Mentor Says Jones Is Profiting From an Invention He Designed. (Wed Oct 25 22:27:17 2017 PDT)
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OR: Willamette Week -- Portland News, Movies, Music, Restaurants, Arts - Willamette Week

Bot - Cannabis - Wed, 10/25/2017 - 00:27
wweek.com (US) The Potlander 2017 "marijuana" The Computer Software Thatb s Supposed to Keep Oregonb s Legal Weed Out of the Black Market is Driving Growers Crazy The Computer Software Thatb s Supposed to Keep Oregonb s Legal Weed Out of the Black Market is Driving Growers Crazy Oregonb s b seed to saleb cannabis tracking software is the target of growing frustration. (Wed Oct 25 22:27:17 2017 PDT)
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