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Woman who accidentally suffocated newborn sues Oregon hospital - The Washington Post

Drug News Bot - Sat, 08/12/2017 - 00:03
Woman who accidentally suffocated newborn sues Oregon hospital - The Washington Post (US) It was nearlyB midnight one Sunday in the summer of 2012 when Thompson, who had undergone aB Caesarean section a few days earlier, was given a cocktail of narcotic painkillers and sleep aids. The lawyer, Diego Conde, called the death b senselessb and... (Sat Aug 12 23:03:20 2017 PDT) [$drug_related(100%), $drugwar_propaganda(75%), $propaganda_theme2(75%), $propaganda_theme3(65%), $propaganda_theme5(75%), $illegal_drugs(100%), $narcotic(100%), $youth(75%), $aggrandizement(100%), $msm(100%), $mockingbird(100%)]
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US AZ: Column: Dead Letters

MAP Drugnews - Top Stories - Fri, 08/11/2017 - 23:00
Tucson Weekly, 10 Aug 2017 - Sessions' correspondence to marijuana states is full of smoke and mirror While certain federal administration officials take to Twitter to air their grievances, those stuck in last century use more traditional means for their loosely-supported rants.
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US OH: Marijuana Cultivation Warehouse Approved For North Toledo -

MAP Drugnews - Top Stories - Fri, 08/11/2017 - 23:00
The Blade, 11 Aug 2017 - The site of the proposed warehouse is vacant land at Jason Street and Cassandra Drive. A Cleveland-based company that has applied for a state license to grow medical marijuana won approval Thursday from the Toledo Plan Commission to build a 60,000-square-foot cultivation warehouse near Alexis Road and Suder Avenue.
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Pot-Sniffing Dogs Role Unclear With Marijuana Legalized - U.S. News & World Report

Google - Cannabis - Fri, 08/11/2017 - 22:02

Pot-Sniffing Dogs Role Unclear With Marijuana Legalized
U.S. News & World Report
Since the McKnight decision, Denver has planned to start using some dogs not trained to detect marijuana. Meanwhile, police in Pueblo have no plans to phase out their cannabis-capable canines. At the time of publication, police in Fort Collins ...

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Watch: Neil DeGrasse Tyson Thinks Marijuana Should Be Legal

Alternet - Fri, 08/11/2017 - 20:47
Click here for reuse options! While the astrophysicist prefers reality to altered states, he doesn't believe pot should be illegal.

Neil deGrasse Tyson, the beloved astrophysicist, showed up on StarTalk's inaugural Facebook Live show to promote his book Astrophysics for People in a Hurry, but wound up discussing the legalization of marijuana.

Tom Angell, from a pro-legalization group called Marijuana Majority, asked Tyson if he agreed with the late Carl Sagan, who believed marijuana should be legal.

Tyson responded, "If you really analyze it, relative to other things that are legal, there’s no reason for it to ever have been made illegal in the system of laws."

He elaborated that alcohol is legal and a more dangerous substance than marijuana.

While pro-legalization, Tyson is not a fan of altered states on a personal level. In a 2015 Reddit AMA, Tyson wrote, “I don’t count myself among active recreational drug users. For me, the least altered state of awareness I can achieve is the one I seek, because that one is most likely to be closest to reality.”

For those who'd like to spend an hour listening to Tyson answer questions with his signature charm, the full video is embedded below.

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Poughkeepsie police discover two pounds of marijuana during a traffic stop - Poughkeepsie Journal

Google - Cannabis - Fri, 08/11/2017 - 14:37

Poughkeepsie Journal

Poughkeepsie police discover two pounds of marijuana during a traffic stop
Poughkeepsie Journal
A Poughkeepsie woman was arrested with more than a pound of marijuana in her vehicle Thursday following a traffic stop in the Town of Wappinger. Jamila Chlih, 22, was charged with second-degree criminal possession of marijuana, a felony, and the ...

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Opioids: An Important Treatment That Can Be Used Responsibly

Alternet - Fri, 08/11/2017 - 13:20
Click here for reuse options! Don't throw the baby out with the bath water.

So it’s official. The opioid crisis is a national emergency.

The grim statistics support that conclusion. About 52,000 Americans died of a drug overdose in 2015, or a rate of 142 each day. The numbers for 2016 will almost surely be higher once the final figures are calculated.

I’m pleased that the president declared a national emergency. Although in his brief remarks yesterday he did not commit his administration to any specific policies, his declaration suggests he will support efforts to make treatment for drug addiction more widely available. This is absolutely necessary. We also need to ensure persons with mental health issues receive appropriate care. As the president’s Commission on Combatting Drug Addiction and the Opioid Crisis found, approximately 40 percent of those with a substance abuse disorder have a significant mental health problem. For these individuals, their addiction, although serious in itself, is likely a symptom of a grave underlying problem.

I’m less pleased with legislation that has now been adopted by 17 states—and may be adopted by the federal government—which places significant restrictions on a physician’s ability to prescribe opioid painkillers based on the physician’s individualized assessment of the patient’s needs. The regulations vary from state-to-state, but the trend appears to be increasingly tighter restrictions. Kentucky recently adopted a law limiting opioid prescriptions for acute pain to three days.

There’s no question that the overprescribing of opioids by ‘pill mills’—typically self-described pain clinics—was a major contributing cause of the rise in opioid addiction in the 1990s and early 2000s. How many individuals innocently became addicted because they were misinformed about the risk of addiction as opposed to those who became addicted because they consciously sought a relatively cheap high is not known and is perhaps unknowable and is, in any event immaterial, as whatever the patients’ motivation, the prescribing physicians acted unethically and, perhaps, illegally. But the fact that opioid painkillers can be, and have been, improperly prescribed should not cause us to lose sight of the fact that opioid painkillers serve a legitimate medical purpose.

Yes, many Americans have become addicted to opioids, and some of those first became addicted as a result of prescribed medication. However, many, many more Americans have used prescribed opioids responsibly. They have not become addicted. Instead, they have benefitted tremendously from the relief that opioid painkillers can provide. I know because I am one of them.

Without getting into too much personal information, I was diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis in 2010. At one point, my condition was so severe that I could hardly walk. After various therapies failed (please: I never want to hear the word “holistic” again), I was prescribed celecoxib (brand name: Celebrex). This drug was almost immediately effective. Unfortunately, over time, it began to have serious side effects. To help me deal with the pain while reducing my use of celecoxib, my physician prescribed the opioid hydrocodone. Through the judicious use of hydrocodone over the last few years—on average, about three 5 mg pills a week—I have managed to wean off celecoxib and still manage my arthritis. I have no craving to move on to stronger drugs, nor at any time have I sought to increase the number of pills prescribed.

Tens of millions of others have also managed their pain through opioids—allowing them to carry on productive lives that otherwise might not have been possible—without becoming addicts. The opioid crisis should not obscure the fact that those who become addicted as a result of using painkillers remain the exception, not the rule.

Each patient is different, of course, but that’s precisely why the recently enacted laws mandating what physicians can prescribe constitute an improper interference with the practice of medicine and the physician-patient relationship. Physicians, not politicians, should determine a patient’s treatment.

Sometimes we must sacrifice personal benefit and personal freedom for the greater good. That’s understandable. But this public policy principle does not justify imposing onerous restrictions on the use of opioids for the treatment of pain. Doing so would penalize those who use these drugs responsibly because some abuse these drugs. Such a policy has no precedent in the modern practice of medicine.

The Morning EmailWake up to the day's most important news.  

Without getting into too much personal information, I was diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis in 2010. At one point, my condition was so severe that I could hardly walk. After various therapies failed (please: I never want to hear the word “holistic” again), I was prescribed celecoxib (brand name: Celebrex). This drug was almost immediately effective. Unfortunately, over time, it began to have serious side effects. To help me deal with the pain while reducing my use of celecoxib, my physician prescribed the opioid hydrocodone. Through the judicious use of hydrocodone over the last few years—on average, about three 5 mg pills a week—I have managed to wean off celecoxib and still manage my arthritis. I have no craving to move on to stronger drugs, nor at any time have I sought to increase the number of pills prescribed.

Tens of millions of others have also managed their pain through opioids—allowing them to carry on productive lives that otherwise might not have been possible—without becoming addicts. The opioid crisis should not obscure the fact that those who become addicted as a result of using painkillers remain the exception, not the rule.

Each patient is different, of course, but that’s precisely why the recently enacted laws mandating what physicians can prescribe constitute an improper interference with the practice of medicine and the physician-patient relationship. Physicians, not politicians, should determine a patient’s treatment.

Sometimes we must sacrifice personal benefit and personal freedom for the greater good. That’s understandable. But this public policy principle does not justify imposing onerous restrictions on the use of opioids for the treatment of pain. Doing so would penalize those who use these drugs responsibly because some abuse these drugs. Such a policy has no precedent in the modern practice of medicine.

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How to kill the marijuana black market - The Denver Post

Google - Cannabis - Fri, 08/11/2017 - 12:56

The Denver Post

How to kill the marijuana black market
The Denver Post
J., has recently introduced legislation to legalize marijuana at the federal level. His bill will no doubt inspire the standard criticisms, one of which is that legalization does not eliminate the black market. Kevin Sabet, director of the Drug Policy ...

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Cannabis Industry Weekly Update 8/11/2017 - Forbes

Google - Cannabis - Fri, 08/11/2017 - 11:57

Cannabis Industry Weekly Update 8/11/2017
Forbes
The Marijuana Index started Monday at 114 and ticked down to a close of 109 on Thursday. Investors haven't been too happy with a failed drug trial and disappointing earnings. The big bomb this week was Zynerba Pharmaceuticals. There were high hopes ...

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Feds to Study Medical Marijuana's Effect on Opioid Use - Leafly

Google - Cannabis - Fri, 08/11/2017 - 11:43

Leafly

Feds to Study Medical Marijuana's Effect on Opioid Use
Leafly
... reliance on medical cannabis to manage and alleviate their pain. Notably, the study will use real medical cannabis from licensed dispensaries in New York State, not the lower-quality “research grade” cannabis grown by federal contractors in ...

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How and When to Flush Cannabis Plants - Leafly

Google - Cannabis - Fri, 08/11/2017 - 10:59

Leafly

How and When to Flush Cannabis Plants
Leafly
When starting out as a cannabis grower, “flushing” is a term you might be unfamiliar with. Although visions of frantically trying to shove a cannabis plant down a toilet may come to mind, flushing is actually when you stop feeding the plants nutrients ...

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Serious About Opioid Crisis? Then Don’t Slash Medicaid

Alternet - Fri, 08/11/2017 - 10:11
Republicans are still considering making dramatic cuts in the program that would severely handicap efforts to overcome the opioid epidemic.

 

 

Serious About Opioid Crisis? Then Don’t Slash Medicaid

The opioid epidemic is a major public health crisis, devastating communities across the country. Opioids cause serious harm to the body and can lead to deadly overdoses. They also put people at risk of contracting viruses such as HIV and Hepatitis C, which cause chronic and potentially life-threatening illness and result in millions of dollars in…

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Just Say Know to Drugs: Festival and Club Pill Testing Can Make Partying Safer

Alternet - Fri, 08/11/2017 - 10:01
Pill testing is increasingly becoming part of U.K. festivals and clubs. The U.S. may want to pay attention.

For the first time, people going to BoomTown this weekend will be able to find out what’s in the drugs they plan to take, by getting them tested by non-profit organisation The Loop. Front of house drugs safety testing, or Multi Agency Safety Testing (MAST), was first offered by The Loop at Secret Garden Party and Kendal Calling in 2016. This was such a success that they have been invited to provide their service at a number of festivals this year, BoomTown being the next on the calendar.

A growing number of festivals are now openly discussing a new approach to drugs, based on information and harm reduction rather than criminal justice. This shift in attitudes is coming at a very welcome time. Recent developments in the European drug market have seen an unprecedented rise in the strength of ecstasy tablets, with a number of recent reports of adverse health effects, including emergency medical treatment and fatalities, attributed to MDMA toxicity. Indeed, Office for National Statistics figures show an eightfold increase in deaths related to ecstasy in five years, rising to 63 in 2016 from an all-time low of 8 in 2010.

Without specialist drug testing services it is very difficult for drug users to know what they are taking, particularly with regard to potency and purity. Essentially, they have to rely on word of mouth and potentially inaccurate reports based on indicators such as colours or logos on tablets. These methods are unreliable and potentially life threatening. As high quality pills with a distinctive logo and colour develop a good reputation among users, other manufacturers will copy these designs to increase their profits, while changing the contents of the pill. Given that festivals and drug use go hand in hand for a number of people, services such as The Loop that offer drugs safety testing without the fear of criminal sanction would appear vital to avoid health related problems.

The importance of The Loop’s service has already been demonstrated this year, with their detection of the stimulant N-ethyl-pentylone – being missold as MDMA – which was reportedly causing medical incidents at Kendal Calling. The Loop was able to issue an alert with a description of the blue “Anonymous” pill, and this was circulated on social media by the festival and other on-site agencies so as to warn other potential users of their findings. This new approach replaces the traditional message of ‘just say no to drugs’, with timely, relevant and evidence-based advice: just say ‘know’.

The question is, therefore, do services like The Loop actually change behaviour and reduce harm? There is surprisingly little research, despite drugs safety testing being a mainstay in some European countries, such as the Netherlands, for years. A study examining whether such services do actually result in changes in behaviour was published earlier this year. Analysing data collected at music events in the USA by drugs testing company, DanceSafe, the authors found that people whose samples contained something other than MDMA were far less likely to report that they intended to use the drug as those whose samples were positive for MDMA. In other words, being told that the samples contained something unexpected resulted in people saying they would be less likely to take that drug. However, the method used by DanceSafe to test for the presence of MDMA – colorimetric reagent kits – can say only whether MDMA is likely to be present or not, and cannot determine the strength of the pills. The Loop, meanwhile, offers much more comprehensive testing, including infrared and ultraviolet spectroscopy, all conducted by PhD level chemists.

The Loop itself is also evaluating whether its services actually change people’s behaviour towards safer drug use practices, as part of an ongoing research project with Durham University. Their preliminary results are looking promising: last year one in five people handed over drugs to be disposed of after receiving their test results and the harm reduction advice they received. Moreover, this year at Kendal Calling, four in 10 reported that they now intended to use a lower dose after using the service. This is a particularly important outcome, given that the increasing rate of ecstasy-related deaths in the UK has been attributed to high strength pills leading to overdose.

Of course, drugs safety testing is not without limitations. For instance, just because the tested sample doesn’t appear to contain any harmful adulterants, there is no guarantee that all the pills in your pocket are definitely ‘clean’- pill content and strength can vary even in the same batch. Additionally no drug is completely safe, and knowing what’s in your drugs doesn’t mean you won’t experience problems. For these reasons The Loop’s test results are reported back within a structured harm reduction session – delivered by clinically experienced substance misuse practitioners – during which they draw attention to these limitations. Future research should also focus on how test results are interpreted by festivalgoers, and whether people take on board these cautions.

Initial reports from The Loop about the effectiveness of their service, along with the study from the USA are encouraging, but further quantitative research is required in the UK and Europe to conclusively say that this approach works. The Loop will continue to collate and analyse quantitative data to aid that evaluation.

At UCL we are currently running a study into the nightlife scene in partnership with a number of institutions in Europe, including the Trimbos Institute, which pioneered the use of drug testing facilities as a harm reduction tool in the Netherlands – indeed, The Loop hopes to compare their findings with the Trimbos testing database. Our study includes an online survey that is currently live, and we will follow up respondents next year using another survey. Harm reduction, including the use of testing services, forms a major component of our survey and we believe it is crucial to compare how people in the UK and elsewhere in Europe respond to these initiatives. For this reason we’d like as many people who attend festivals or who go clubbing anywhere across the UK, to complete the survey. Head to our website now if you would like to take part.

 

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Study: Marijuana users 3 times more likely to die from high... - WPLG - Local 10

Google - Cannabis - Fri, 08/11/2017 - 09:48

Local 10

Study: Marijuana users 3 times more likely to die from high... - WPLG
Local 10
A new study found marijuana smokers were three times more likely to die from high blood pressure than those who do not use the drug.

and more »
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Arkansas Has Received Zero Applications to Grow or Dispense Medical Cannabis - Leafly

Google - Cannabis - Fri, 08/11/2017 - 09:35

Leafly

Arkansas Has Received Zero Applications to Grow or Dispense Medical Cannabis
Leafly
Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration spokesman Scott Hardin told The Associated Press Friday morning that the agency had received no applications to grow and distribute medical marijuana. “We are not concerned, as we understand the ...
No Applications to Grow, Dispense Arkansas Medical MarijuanaU.S. News & World Report

all 25 news articles »
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Is a looming US crackdown opening the way for Canadian cannabis companies? - Globalnews.ca

Google - Cannabis - Fri, 08/11/2017 - 06:42

Globalnews.ca

Is a looming US crackdown opening the way for Canadian cannabis companies?
Globalnews.ca
A return to harsh enforcement of U.S. federal marijuana laws creates a market opportunity for Canada's cannabis companies, a Canadian pot entrepreneur argues. Recreational marijuana has become legal in more and more U.S. states – four states currently ...

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Cannabis producer wants to set up in Clarenville - The Packet

Google - Cannabis - Fri, 08/11/2017 - 05:36

The Packet

Cannabis producer wants to set up in Clarenville
The Packet
CLARENVILLE, N.L. — There appears to a budding market for a new type of business in Clarenville. Advertisement. It's so new, in fact, there are currently no development regulations for a proposed “medical cannabis production facility” among the town's ...

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OR: 5 things for August 11: North Korea, McConnell, New Orleans, opioids, Taylor Swift - kugn-am

Bot - Cannabis - Fri, 08/11/2017 - 00:59
kugn.com Taylor Swift The opioid crisis is officiallyB a national emergency. (Fri Aug 11 21:59:25 2017 PDT)
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FL: Marijuana company buys California town, plans pot paradise - ABC-7.com WZVN News for Fort Myers, Cape Coral and Naples, Florida

Bot - Cannabis - Fri, 08/11/2017 - 00:59
abc-7.com (US) Plans pot paradise The entire town of 120 acres was purchased Thursday by American Green Inc. (Fri Aug 11 20:59:23 2017 PDT)
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