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AK: Report: Alaska marijuana revenue declines in February, expected to rebound in March - Juneau Empire - Alaska's Capital City Online Newspaper

Bot - Cannabis - Thu, 04/05/2018 - 01:09
juneauempire.com (US) Report: Alaska marijuana revenue declines in February, expected to rebound in March ! Juneau Empire - Alaska's Capital City Online Newspaper Report: Alaska marijuana revenue declines in February, expected to rebound in March Alaska's marijuana tax revenue dipped in February, ... (Thu Apr 05 18:09:21 2018 PDT)
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AK: Alaska Journal - Marijuana board to take up onsite consumption Friday

Bot - Cannabis - Thu, 04/05/2018 - 01:07
alaskajournal.com (US) Alaska Journal ! Marijuana board to take up onsite consumption Friday The Marijuana Control Board will take up onsite consumption and make recommendations to change how the industry is taxed at its April 4-6 meeting in Nome. (Thu Apr 05 18:07:44 2018 PDT)
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CANADA: Day-long session in Sydney looks at cannabis and other drug use in the workplace - Business - Cape Breton Post

Bot - Cannabis - Thu, 04/05/2018 - 01:05
capebretonpost.com (US) Day-long session in Sydney looks at cannabis and other drug use in the workplace ! Business ! Cape Breton Post Day-long session in Sydney looks at cannabis and other drug use in the workplace The Construction Association of Nova Scotia will be hosting a one-day workshop next month on cannabis and other drugs that can be abused by employees in the workplace. (Thu Apr 05 02:05:43 2018 PDT)
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CANADA: Day-long session in Sydney looks at cannabis and other drug use in the workplace - Business - Cape Breton Post

Drug News Bot - Thu, 04/05/2018 - 01:05
capebretonpost.com (US) Day-long session in Sydney looks at cannabis and other drug use in the workplace ! Business ! Cape Breton Post Day-long session in Sydney looks at cannabis and other drug use in the workplace The Construction Association of Nova Scotia will be hosting a one-day workshop next month on cannabis and other drugs that can be abused by employees in the workplace. (Thu Apr 05 02:05:43 2018 PDT) [$drug_related(100%), $drugwar_propaganda(100%), $propaganda_theme2(70%), $propaganda_theme3(65%), $use_is_abuse(100%), $propaganda_theme4(100%), $propaganda_theme6(75%), $illegal_drugs(100%), $drugs(95%), $drug_policy(100%), $chemicals(50%), $plants(100%), $intoxicant(100%), $depressant_intoxicant(50%), $alcohol(50%), $cannabis(100%), $various_drugs(95%), $incarceration(100%), $school(100%), $aggrandizement(100%), $jury(100%)]
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INTERNATIONAL: CBD Archives - Drugnews

Bot - Cannabis - Thu, 04/05/2018 - 01:02
drugnews.nu (Europe) CBD Archives - Drugnews Cannabis Cannabis medicin? Cannabis FC6retag fC6rbjuds sC$lja cannabisolja "Cannabis viktig basinkomst fC6r gC$ngen" FC6retag fC6rbjuds sC$lja cannabisolja CBD Tre sve... (Thu Apr 05 01:02:53 2018 PDT)
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INTERNATIONAL: Journalistmord skakar Slovakien - Drugnews

Bot - Cannabis - Thu, 04/05/2018 - 01:02
drugnews.nu (Europe) Cannabis Cannabis medicin? Cannabis FC6retag fC6rbjuds sC$lja cannabisolja "Cannabis viktig basinkomst fC6r gC$ngen" Sven Liljesson, Drugnews ... (Thu Apr 05 01:02:53 2018 PDT)
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INTERNATIONAL: Journalistmord skakar Slovakien - Drugnews

Drug News Bot - Thu, 04/05/2018 - 01:02
drugnews.nu (Europe) Cannabis Cannabis medicin? Cannabis FC6retag fC6rbjuds sC$lja cannabisolja "Cannabis viktig basinkomst fC6r gC$ngen" Sven Liljesson, Drugnews ... (Thu Apr 05 01:02:53 2018 PDT) [$drug_related(100%), $drugwar_propaganda(100%), $propaganda_theme1(90%), $propaganda_theme2(60%), $use_is_abuse(75%), $propaganda_theme4(75%), $propaganda_theme5(70%), $propaganda_theme6(60%), $propaganda_theme7(100%), $illegal_drugs(100%), $drugs(95%), $prohibitionist(80%), $legalization(100%), $chemicals(100%), $plants(100%), $pharms(100%), $euphoric_depressant(100%), $analgesic(100%), $anesthetic(100%), $intoxicant(100%), $opioid(100%), $narcotic(100%), $opiate(100%), $heroin(100%), $cannabis(100%), $tobacco(100%), $fentanyl(100%), $various_drugs(95%), $youth(70%)]
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INTERNATIONAL: CBD Archives - Drugnews

Drug News Bot - Thu, 04/05/2018 - 01:02
drugnews.nu (Europe) CBD Archives - Drugnews Cannabis Cannabis medicin? Cannabis FC6retag fC6rbjuds sC$lja cannabisolja "Cannabis viktig basinkomst fC6r gC$ngen" FC6retag fC6rbjuds sC$lja cannabisolja CBD Tre sve... (Thu Apr 05 01:02:53 2018 PDT) [$drug_related(100%), $drugwar_propaganda(100%), $propaganda_theme1(90%), $propaganda_theme2(60%), $use_is_abuse(75%), $propaganda_theme4(75%), $propaganda_theme5(70%), $propaganda_theme6(60%), $propaganda_theme7(100%), $illegal_drugs(100%), $drugs(95%), $prohibitionist(80%), $legalization(100%), $chemicals(100%), $plants(100%), $pharms(100%), $euphoric_depressant(100%), $analgesic(100%), $anesthetic(100%), $intoxicant(100%), $opioid(100%), $narcotic(100%), $opiate(100%), $heroin(100%), $cannabis(100%), $tobacco(100%), $fentanyl(100%), $various_drugs(95%), $youth(70%)]
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Marijuana Advocate Gets Probation for Pot-Smoking Party - U.S. News & World Report

Google - Cannabis - Wed, 04/04/2018 - 21:55

PhillyVoice.com

Marijuana Advocate Gets Probation for Pot-Smoking Party
U.S. News & World Report
Marijuana Advocate Gets Probation for Pot-Smoking Party. A marijuana advocate who invited hundreds of people to his pot-smoking party at a Philadelphia warehouse has been fined, ordered to perform community service and sentenced to four years ...
Philadelphia marijuana activist gets four years probation in high-profile 'Smoke Session' casePhillyVoice.com

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Two New Studies Suggest Opioid Prescriptions Drop in States with Legalized Marijuana - Snopes.com

Google - Cannabis - Wed, 04/04/2018 - 20:48

Snopes.com

Two New Studies Suggest Opioid Prescriptions Drop in States with Legalized Marijuana
Snopes.com
In the second study, researchers used data on the rate of opioid prescriptions covered by Medicaid in different states to assess how changes in marijuana policy affected those rates. For the period from 2011 to 2016, they found a 5.88 percent reduction ...
Banking dilemma kills medical cannabis businessWV News
Places with legal marijuana issue fewer opioid prescriptions, large studies findPBS NewsHour
Calgary skier Jan Hudec propelled by his pain as he enters cannabis industryCBC.ca
KDRV -WDIV ClickOnDetroit -The Globe and Mail -The JAMA Network
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Marijuana Use Tied to Fatal Car Crashes - New York Times

Google - Cannabis - Wed, 04/04/2018 - 20:07

New York Times

Marijuana Use Tied to Fatal Car Crashes
New York Times
April 20 has become known as a day to celebrate the pleasures of marijuana consumption with parties that traditionally begin at 4:20 p.m.. But a study in JAMA Internal Medicine has found that the high spirits may have a price: a significant increase in ...

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Justice Department seizes over 100 homes in crackdown on marijuana operation - Reuters

Google - Cannabis - Wed, 04/04/2018 - 15:52

Reuters

Justice Department seizes over 100 homes in crackdown on marijuana operation
Reuters
In a two-day sweep that started on Tuesday, the Justice Department said hundreds of federal agents and local police executed search warrants at about 74 homes and two business offices believed to be used for marijuana-growing operations. At the same ...
US Justice Dept seizes over 100 homes in crackdown on marijuana operationABS-CBN News

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$10M marijuana processing plant coming to east London - Globalnews.ca

Google - Cannabis - Wed, 04/04/2018 - 15:04

The Denver Channel

$10M marijuana processing plant coming to east London
Globalnews.ca
Tilray CEO, Brendan Kennedy, says the plant will be getting marijuana from High Park Farms, a 100-acre property with 13 acres of greenhouse that's under construction in Enniskillen, near Sarnia. “Our intent is that all of the products that High Park ...
Colorado towns back ballot questions on marijuana businessThe Denver Channel
From Calgary city hall: Should cannabis use be limited to homes?Calgary Herald
Pot of gold: Big Food could cash in on cannabis-infused edibles marketFood Dive

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Maybe White People Shouldn't Take Drugs From Indigenous Cultures

Alternet - Wed, 04/04/2018 - 13:18
Click here for reuse options! Ayahuasca and peyote are more popular than ever, but think twice before trying them.

White people love to try drugs from other cultures. Just think of the scene in Zoolander when Hansel recounts a story to Derek about hallucinating that he’s falling off a mountain, and suddenly remembers he’s been “smoking peyote for six straight days.” Other iconic white guys in cinema have famously partaken: Tony Soprano, the stars of “Young Guns.” Ben Stiller experiments with ayahuasca in While We’re Young in an attempt to spice up his love life with his wife. There are enough examples of these scenes to say there is a trope in television and film of sending a reserved character on a spiritual awakening by having them experiment with psychedelic drugs. In other cases, it is a way to solidify a character’s New Age kookiness, as in the case of Hansel or Lily Tomlin’s character in Netflix’s “Grace and Frankie.” But while these scenes can be humorous, they also normalize and publicize the use of drugs that white people arguably don’t have a right to. 

Ayahuasca is one such drug that’s been particularly in vogue among white people lately; so much so that the New Yorker dubbed it the "drug of choice for the age of kale.” The hallucinogenic tea is traditionally brewed by the native groups of the Amazon rainforest for medicinal and shamanic purposes. Tribes in several Brazilian religions drink it as a spiritual rite. While some hipsters cook it up in their Bushwick kitchenettes, traditionalists insist that the drug only be tested in its native South America. Often when white characters in movies and television shows take ayahuasca or peyote, the medicinal and spiritual context is left out, perpetuating false beliefs about why indigenous communities use them to begin with.

Drug use can certainly fit into contemporary definitions of cultural appropriation, which is legally defined as "taking intellectual property, traditional knowledge, cultural expressions, or artifacts from someone else's culture without permission," Susan Scafidi, the author of Who Owns Culture? Appropriation and Authenticity in American Law, told Jezebel, "This can include unauthorized use of another culture's dance, dress, music, language, folklore, cuisine, traditional medicine, religious symbols, etc. It's most likely to be harmful when the source community is a minority group that has been oppressed or exploited in other ways or when the object of appropriation is particularly sensitive, e.g. sacred objects."

Note Scafidi’s definition includes “traditional medicine." Of course, not all non-native people who take ayahuasca take the drug purely for recreational purposes; some want to pay homage to indigenous wisdom. But really, how many could that be, compared to those who simply want to follow in Jennifer Aniston’s footsteps?

Whatever their intent, the appropriation of ayahuasca has negatively impacted the economies of the communities they come from, particularly when tourists travel to pursue psychedelic drugs. In 2016, Vice reported on the impact of the ayahuasca craze in the Amazon, where community experts say it has commodified the practice in a way that cheapens the actual spiritual practice of ayahuasca. “As ayahuasca has become more and more popular with foreign tourists….we have found that pseudo shamans have sprung up everywhere to cater for the demand," Valerie Meikle, a Reiki master and holistic healer, told Vice. "This means that the ayahuasca rituals have obviously lost some of their original power and very often the ceremony is adapted to suit foreigners who are ready to pay high prices on low-quality rituals." The overall impact cheapens the very practice these tourists seek.

Peyote has also been appropriated by white drug enthusiasts in regions of Mexico. Vice writes: “Under Mexican law only the Wixárika can consume peyote, but New Age enthusiasts are eagerly simulating this experience by partaking in an illicit peyote-based tourist trap booming in nearby Real de Catorce. The dusty former ghost town is brimming with non-indigenous fixers offering tourists peyote and a place to trip. For the Wixárika, the trend adds insult to injury. ‘We’re upset that people come here and steal peyote because for us it’s a deity, not a drug,' [local representative Aukwe] Mijarez told Vice. 'It’s part of our identity and we respect it.'”

As more white tourists flock to these regions to take from local cultural practices, progressive organizations are increasingly vocal about protecting them. “We advise people to be very cautious about non-Indigenous controlled establishments that have anything to do with Indigenous peoples, their lands, cultures, and resources, period,” Agnes Portalewska, communications manager of Cultural Survival, a nonprofit that seeks to advance indigenous peoples’ rights worldwide, told AlterNet. “Ayahuasca, peyote, etc. are spiritual and cultural practices that are rooted in specific cultures and should not be commercialized and exploited, but protected as private community sacred practices."

“Cultural appropriation is a huge problem when it comes to Indigenous cultures, and especially spirituality," she added. "A huge part of this spiritual tourism is that the practice is taken out of context, exploited and commercialized.”

Some drugs have been so appropriated into white circles, we’ve forgotten we took them from other cultures in the first place. Psychedelic mushrooms grow across all continents, but became popular after Valentina and R. Gordon Wasson, a J.P. Morgan banker and his wife, wrote in Life Magazine in 1957 about their experience participating in an indigenous mushroom ceremony in Oaxaca, Mexico. Inspired by their account, Timothy Leary, the father of the psychedelic drug movement, traveled to Mexico to experience psilocybin mushrooms for himself, inspiring generations of hippies and drug enthusiasts to seek the far-out experience as well. Now you can find shrooms in the fanny pack of nearly any festival-goer at Coachella.

White people’s drug usage in general is filled with hypocrisies beyond the realm of cultural appropriation. Just look to the current irony of marijuana in the U.S.: while white men dominate the burgeoning legal industry, making millions in profits, black and brown people are still disproportionately punished for possessing and selling it.

Our increasingly globalized world means white people will continue to seek out things that do not belong to them, so to suggest we shouldn't appropriate drugs from other cultures is pretty futile. The only possible solution is the same one that’s been proposed for repairing acts of cultural appropriation in music, fashion and food: we need to pay proper tribute to the culture the practice comes from, honor its history and do everything possible to financially compensate the community from which it came.  

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The Science Can No Longer Be Ignored: Legal Cannabis Access Reduces Opioid Abuse and Mortality

Alternet - Wed, 04/04/2018 - 12:51
Click here for reuse options! For many patients, cannabis offers a viable alternative to opioids.

Scientific data is growing exponentially in support of the notion that legalized cannabis access can significantly mitigate opioid use and abuse.

On Monday, the esteemed Journal of the American Medical Association, Internal Medicine published a pair of persuasive new studies reinforcing this opinion.

In the first study, investigators from the University of Kentucky and Emory University assessed the relationship between medical and adult-use marijuana laws and opioid prescribing patterns among Medicaid enrollees nationwide. Enrollees included all Medicaid fee-for-service and managed care enrollees—a high-risk population for chronic pain, opioid use disorder, and opioid overdose.

Researchers reported that the enactment of both medicalization and adult-use laws were both associated with reductions in opioid prescribing rates, with broader legalization policies associated with the greatest rates of decline.

“State implementation of medical marijuana laws was associated with a 5.88 percent lower rate of opioid prescribing. Moreover, the implementation of adult-use marijuana laws, which all occurred in states with existing medical marijuana laws, was associated with a 6.38 percent lower rate of opioid prescribing,” they concluded. “[T]he further reductions in opioid prescribing associated with the newly implemented adult-use marijuana laws suggest that there were individuals beyond the reach of medical marijuana laws who may also benefit from using marijuana in lieu of opioids. Our finding that the lower opioid prescribing rates associated with adult-use marijuana laws were pronounced in Schedule II opioids further suggest that reaching these individuals may have greater potential to reduce the adverse consequences, such as opioid use disorder and overdose.”

In the second study, University of Georgia researchers evaluated the association between the enactment of medical cannabis access laws and opioid prescribing trends among those eligible for Medicare Part D prescription drug coverage. Researchers reported that medicalization, and specifically the establishment of brick-and-mortar cannabis dispensing facilities, correlated with significantly reduced opioid prescription drug use.

“This longitudinal analysis of Medicare Part D found that prescriptions filled for all opioids decreased by 2.11 million daily doses per year from an average of 23.08 million daily doses per year when a state instituted any medical cannabis law. Prescriptions for all opioids decreased by 3.742 million daily doses per year when medical cannabis dispensaries opened,” they concluded. “Combined with previously published studies suggesting cannabis laws are associated with lower opioid mortality, these findings further strengthen arguments in favor of considering medical applications of cannabis as one tool in the policy arsenal that can be used to diminish the harm of prescription opioids.”

The new findings should come as little surprise to those paying attention. State-specific data from cannabis-access jurisdictions have consistently established that in regions where medical cannabis access is permitted, patients routinely decrease their opioid intake. For instance, according to data published last month by the Minnesota Department of Health, among patients known to be taking opiate painkillers upon their enrollment into the program, 63 percent “were able to reduce or eliminate opioid usage after six months.”

Minnesota’s findings are hardly unique. 2016 data gathered from patients enrolled in Michigan’s cannabis access program reported that marijuana treatment “was associated with a 64 percent decrease in opioid use, decreased number and side effects of medications, and an improved quality of life.” A review of state-registered patients from various northeastern states yielded similar results, finding 77 percent of respondents acknowledged having reduced their use of opioids following cannabis therapy. A significant percentage of respondents also reported decreasing their consumption of anti-anxiety medications (72 percent), migraine-related medications (67 percent), sleep aids (65 percent), and antidepressants (38 percent).

A 2017 assessment of medical cannabis patients in Illinois revealed that participants in the state-run program frequently reported using marijuana "as an alternative to other medications—most commonly opioids, but also anticonvulsants, anti-inflammatories, and over-the-counter analgesics." New Mexico patient data reports: compared to non-users, medical cannabis enrollees "were more likely either to reduce daily opioid prescription dosages between the beginning and end of the sample period (83.8 percent versus 44.8 percent) or to cease filling opioid prescriptions altogether (40.5 percent versus 3.4 percent)."

Two just-published clinical trials from Israel (where medical cannabis use is legally permitted) further affirm this phenomenon. In the first study, which assessed cannabis use among the elderly, investigators reported that over 18 percent of the study's participants "stopped using opioid analgesics or reduced their dose.” They concluded, "Cannabis can decrease the use of other prescription medicines, including opioids." In the second trial, which assessed the safety and efficacy of cannabis in a cohort of over 1,200 cancer patients over a six-month period, scientists reported that nearly half of respondents reported either decreasing or eliminating their use of opioids during treatment.

Another recently published clinical trial provides insight into explaining the physiology behind this relationship. Investigators from Columbia University assessed the efficacy of low doses of inhaled cannabis and sub-therapeutic doses of oxycodone on experimentally-induced pain in a double-blind, placebo-controlled model. Researchers assessed subjects’ pain tolerance after receiving both substances separately or in concert with one another. While neither the administration of cannabis nor oxycodone alone significantly mitigated subjects’ pain, the combined administration of both drugs did so effectively.

Authors determined, “Both active cannabis and a low dose of oxycodone (2.5 mg) were sub-therapeutic, failing to elicit analgesia on their own; however, when administered together, pain responses … were significantly reduced, pointing to the opioid-sparing effects of cannabis.” They concluded, “Smoked cannabis combined with an ineffective analgesic dose of oxycodone produced analgesia comparable to an effective opioid analgesic dose without significantly increasing cannabis’s abuse liability.”

Growing evidence also indicates that patients’ alternative use of cannabis is associated with declining percentages of opioid-induced mortality among adults residing in legal access states. Data published in 2017 in the American Journal of Public Health reported that adult use marijuana sales in Colorado were linked with a 6.5 percent decrease in monthly opioid deaths. A 2014 study published by a team of investigators from the University of Pennsylvania and the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore reported an even stronger correlation. They determined, “States with medical cannabis laws had a 24.8 percent lower mean annual opioid overdose mortality rate compared with states without medical cannabis laws.” A 2015 examination by investigators at the RAND Corporation similarly determined, “[S]tates permitting medical marijuana dispensaries experience a relative decrease in both opioid addictions and opioid overdose deaths compared to states that do not.” A follow-up paper published by these same researchers in February further acknowledged, “[M]edical marijuana laws reduce the misuse of prescription opioids, as reflected in treatment admissions and overdose deaths, primarily through the allowance and opening of dispensaries.”

Despite claims to the contrary from the Trump administration, the available data is consistent and clear. For many patients, cannabis offers a viable alternative to opioids. It is time for the administration to stop placing political ideology above the health and safety of the American public, and to acknowledge the well-established efficacy of medical marijuana in the treatment of chronic pain.

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Tory senators talk pot legalization with Jeff Sessions in DC - CTV News

Google - Cannabis - Wed, 04/04/2018 - 12:06

NJ.com

Tory senators talk pot legalization with Jeff Sessions in DC
CTV News
OTTAWA – Three Conservative senators have descended on D.C. to discuss Canada's plans to legalize marijuana and managed to snag a 45-minute meeting with U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Conservative senators Claude Carignan, Denise Batters, and ...
Here's what NJ thinks about Murphy's push to legalize marijuanaNJ.com
NJ marijuana legalization: Will legal weed make Asbury Park the next Denver?Asbury Park Press
Sessions Talks Marijuana With Anti-Legalization Canadian SenatorsMarijuana Moment

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Watch: New Jersey Cops Grab Man's Genitals in Search of Marijuana

Alternet - Wed, 04/04/2018 - 11:28
They didn't find any weed, so they gave him a ticket for tailgating. Now he's suing.

 

 

Police Grab Man's Genitals in Search of Marijuana

A newly released bodycam video shows New Jersey State Police officers sticking their hands down a driver’s pants during a traffic stop after claiming they smelled marijuana on his person. Jack Levine ...

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Sask. hiring cannabis inspectors, plans to introduce up to $100K fines for illegal dispensaries - CBC.ca

Google - Cannabis - Wed, 04/04/2018 - 10:22

CBC.ca

Sask. hiring cannabis inspectors, plans to introduce up to $100K fines for illegal dispensaries
CBC.ca
Businesses caught selling cannabis without a permit once pot is legalized in Saskatchewan could face six-figure fines. The Cannabis Control Act, recently tabled, outlines the penalties for violating proposed provincial laws around cannabis. The federal ...

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The Bumpy Road to Becoming the Martha Stewart of Cannabis - Entrepreneur

Google - Cannabis - Wed, 04/04/2018 - 09:49

Entrepreneur

The Bumpy Road to Becoming the Martha Stewart of Cannabis
Entrepreneur
Jane West, a mother of two in her 30s, lived in suburban Denver, Colorado. She had a pretty good job planning corporate events, making roughly $90,000 each year working from home. "I loved, loved, loved, this job I had held for eight years," she ...
Bylaw banning public cannabis consumption moves forwardCalgary Herald
Cannabis Sales May Surpass Soda by 2030Bloomberg

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Are Canada's Cannabis Companies Overextended? - Forbes

Google - Cannabis - Wed, 04/04/2018 - 08:29

Forbes

Are Canada's Cannabis Companies Overextended?
Forbes
It's worth looking at what Canadian cannabis companies have going for them, and where the hype may be getting in the way of gaining a clear perspective. Canadian companies have a huge competitive advantage over their American counterparts, due largely ...

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