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Time to Leave Las Vegas, Gaming Commish Tells Cannabis Trade Shows - Leafly

Google - Cannabis - Mon, 08/28/2017 - 13:56

Leafly

Time to Leave Las Vegas, Gaming Commish Tells Cannabis Trade Shows
Leafly
24 unanimously agreed that casino licensees should be “discouraged” from hosting cannabis-related trade shows or conferences in casino convention spaces and ballrooms. “The marijuana industry and the gaming industries are two different industries and ...

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How Cannabis Helped NHL Enforcer Riley Cote Survive His Hockey Career - Leafly

Google - Cannabis - Mon, 08/28/2017 - 13:05

Leafly

How Cannabis Helped NHL Enforcer Riley Cote Survive His Hockey Career
Leafly
From an early age, Cote found cannabis to be extremely helpful in managing pain naturally. In a recent interview with Leafly, he said he learned from his sister, who's managed her multiple sclerosis with the help of a measured intake of natural foods ...

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Smoke and Mirrors: Designer Cannabis Jewelry to Elevate Any Wardrobe - Leafly

Google - Cannabis - Mon, 08/28/2017 - 12:31

Leafly

Smoke and Mirrors: Designer Cannabis Jewelry to Elevate Any Wardrobe
Leafly
Genifer Murray co-founded one of the first cannabis testing labs in the United States in 2010 and wanted to represent the marijuana industry in a “non-threatening and elegant way” while she was lobbying. Enter her father, a technically trained ...

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Maine Works to Regulate Recreational Marijuana Program Amidst Setbacks, Delays - Cannabis Business Times

Google - Cannabis - Mon, 08/28/2017 - 10:33

Cannabis Business Times

Maine Works to Regulate Recreational Marijuana Program Amidst Setbacks, Delays
Cannabis Business Times
In an interview with Cannabis Business Times, Boyer said that MPP, which was the primary sponsor of the bill, had local initiatives in Portland, and they organized a signature drive in 2015 where they collected the 100,000 signatures needed to get the ...

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President of Tasty Budds apologizes after RCMP raid marijuana ... - Globalnews.ca

Google - Cannabis - Mon, 08/28/2017 - 10:15

Globalnews.ca

President of Tasty Budds apologizes after RCMP raid marijuana ...
Globalnews.ca
The president of Tasty Budds has issued an apology after his company's marijuana dispensaries were raided by Nova Scotia RCMP. Ten people were arrested ...
Nova Scotia chain of marijuana dispensaries reopen following raids ...MetroNews Canada

all 3 news articles »
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America's Lucrative New Weed Industry Should Compensate the Black Victims of the County's War on Drugs

Alternet - Mon, 08/28/2017 - 09:45
It was state-sponsored racial terrorism, so reparations should be paid from the profits of the newly legal – and mostly white-owned – cannabis economy

America has long been high on its own endless supply of hypocrisy. The “land of the free” has the largest prison population in the world; the “home of the brave” has elected a coward to the White House. The United States, it has become clear, is still a divided country with different rules for its different coloured citizens. And, arguably, nowhere are those double standards more bluntly black and white than when it comes to the corporatisation of cannabis.

In recent years, the US establishment has gone from piously advising people to Just Say No to drugs, to saying “yes, please” to profiting from pot. To date, eight states have legalised recreational cannabis. Some colleges, such as the University of Denver, have introduced Business of Marijuana courses into their curriculums. Hordes of bright, mainly white, young things have launched lucrative cannabis startups and there’s an interminable stream of trend pieces in the US media about everything from cannabis-kale to how “bud bars” are the fashionable new fixtureat white weddings.

Blue-chip companies are also benefiting from the green rush: Scotts Miracle-Gro, a lawn-care company, saw its shares rise 31% last year, after buying up lots of companies that provide supplies for hydroponics, the favoured method of cultivating cannabis. Guess how many people of colour are on the Scotts leadership team? None.

So while legal marijuana money has started pouring into the US economy, there’s ample evidence that it’s largely white people profiting. A Buzzfeed investigationlast year, for example, estimated only about 1% of the storefront marijuana dispensaries in the US are owned by black people.\The racial inequities in the new marijuana economy are particularly egregious considering the US’s decades-long war on drugs, which disproportionately punished African Americans for petty drug crimes. A 2013 report from the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) found black people are almost four times more likely to be arrested for marijuana possession than white people, despite similar usage rates. The war on drugs has always been sanitised shorthand for: The War on Non-White People, With a Particular Emphasis on Black People.

The US’s racist approach to marijuana – both past and present – is hardly news. But what do we do about it? Well, I’ve got an idea: reparations. Every business now exploiting the legalisation of marijuana should forfeit at least 50% of their pot-based profits to a fund that gives reparations to people whose lives were destroyed by the US’s discriminatory war on drugs.

If this sounds fanciful, it shouldn’t. There is a longstanding debate in the US aboutwhether the government should compensate African Americans for the legacy of slavery – and the war on drugs is very much part of that legacy. Indeed, slavery was never entirely abolished in the US, it simply evolved, as white America found less overt ways to beat down its black population. Slavery 2.0 was the Jim Crow laws, that segregated and disenfranchised black people from around 1890 to the early 1950s. Slavery 3.0 took the form of what has been described as the “new Jim Crow”: the mass incarceration of black people. In her highly influential 2010 book, The New Jim Crow, legal scholar Michelle Alexander explains that “rather than rely on race, we use our criminal justice system to label people of colour ‘criminals’ and then engage in all the practices we supposedly left behind … employment discrimination, housing discrimination, denial of the right to vote, denial of educational opportunity … are suddenly legal ... We have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it.”

There has been a lot of pushback against the idea of reparations for slavery. In a poll conducted last year, 81% of white people opposed the idea. Arguments against reparations for slavery tend to focus on the fact that slavery is a long time past. A National Review article entitled The Case Against Reparations argues, for example, that: “The people to whom reparations were owed are long dead; our duty is to the living, and to generations yet to come, and their interests are best served by liberty and prosperity, not by moral theatre.”

You can’t argue any of these counterpoints when it comes to the case for marijuana reparations, however. Many of the people whose lives were ruined by disproportionally harsh punishment for petty drug crimes are still alive and suffering the consequences. What’s more, it’s hard to talk about moral theatre when you’re taking money from people who are currently profiting from drugs and giving it to people who were incarcerated for attempting to profit from drugs.

Reparations only seem to be contentious when the people receiving money aren’t white. In 2015, for example, a bill signed by Barack Obama established the US Victims of State Sponsored Terrorism Fund. This uncontroversial fund seizes assets from terrorist financiers and uses the money to compensate US victims of terrorism by state sponsors of terrorism. Much of the money for the fund has come from French bank BNP Paribas, which was fined $9bn in 2014 for violating US sanctions against Iran, Cuba and Sudan. Earlier this year the criminal division announced that more than $800m (£621m) had been paid out from the fund to individuals such as the Iran hostages held from 1979 to 1981.

The US’s war against drugs, I don’t think it’s any exaggeration to say, was state-sponsored racial terrorism. The only reason it’s not widely recognised as such, and there isn’t a compensation fund, is because racism is one hell of a drug.

 

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Cannabis Shows Promise In Treating Schizophrenia And Tourette Syndrome - Forbes

Google - Cannabis - Mon, 08/28/2017 - 09:26

Cannabis Shows Promise In Treating Schizophrenia And Tourette Syndrome
Forbes
Despite cannabis' history in folk pharmacopoeias, clinical studies of its medicinal impact remain limited in many areas. Based on some promising early results, researchers are now calling for a closer look at its applications for certain mental health ...

and more »
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The Opioid Epidemic is Finally a National Emergency -- Eight Years Too Late

Alternet - Mon, 08/28/2017 - 08:48
Addiction scientists know what needs to be done to turn the tide. Politicians should ask them.

“It has been many long, hard, agonizing battles for the last few years and you fought like a warrior every step of the way. Addiction, however, won the war. To the person who doesn’t understand addiction, she is just another statistic who chose to make a bad decision.”

Despite working nearly two decades as an addiction scientist, I cannot read Kelsey Grace Endicott’s mother’s eulogy without crying. The opioid epidemic has turned those who lost their lives to addiction into statistics, while leaving their families in sorrow.

Overdose deaths in the U.S. have tripled since 2000, with 52,404 deaths in 2015 as the highest ever recorded. While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has yet to release official statistics for 2016, early estimates put the number of deaths at as many as 65,000.

On August 10, President Trump declared the opioid epidemic a national emergency. Nearly a decade into this epidemic, this national emergency was declared at least eight years too late. Policymakers have missed opportunities to implement strategies scientifically demonstrated to reduce overdose deaths and help people recover.

Declaring a national emergency is important, but it’s not clear what steps the administration will take or how much funding will be committed to these strategies. We have proven prevention and treatment services that we need to significantly expand, and we need the money to do this.

The right treatments

Declaring the opioid epidemic a national emergency expands the availability of federal funding; frees up public health workers to address the issue; and makes it possible to remove regulatory barriers to lifesaving medications.

In a speech on May 11, Attorney General Jeff Sessions suggested that tools like “Just Say No” and Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE) can help fight the opioid epidemic.

However, addiction science has repeatedly proven that such drug prevention programs are ineffective. Some would argue that we are biologically wired to try new things, so education alone is not sufficient to prevent repeated drug use.

Prevention efforts are part of the solution, but we need more immediate solutions for people already ensnared by addiction. Naloxone, known by the brand name Narcan, is usually the only thing that can prevent death when someone has overdosed on opioids. Science has unequivocally demonstrated that naloxone can reverse an opioid overdose, if administered in time and in an adequate dose.

When patients with opioid use disorders are treated with FDA-approved medications like methadone and buprenorphine, they not only reduce their use of opioids but they are also less likely to overdose. When these drugs are used to treat addiction, they are referred to as medication-assisted treatment. Medication-assisted treatment helps many people, particularly early in recovery, when otherwise their brains seem to focus only on using more drugs. In fact, a National Institute on Drug Abuse study found that only about 7 percent of patients can stop using opioids without buprenorphine.

We need drugs like naloxone and buprenorphine to prevent deaths and help people recover from addiction. In the past few years, state governments have taken significant steps to remove regulatory barriers and expand community access to naloxone.

But policies are infrequently aligned with addiction science. In 2015, only 11 percent of people who needed addiction treatment received it. There are not enough medication-assisted treatment treatment slots available: A recent study estimated that the U.S. was short 1.3 million treatment slots for medication-assisted treatment in 2012. Demand has only increased since then.

There is an entrenched belief that people choose to use drugs and that this choice reflects a moral failing. Even the director of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Resources – which cites medication-assisted treatment as part of its strategy – has been quoted saying: “If we’re just substituting one opioid for another, we’re not moving the dial much.”

Moving too slowly

Early on, everyone believed that the epidemic was fueled by widely available prescription pain relievers. Books like “American Pain” by John Temple described “drug tourists” routinely traveling from states like Kentucky and West Virginia to Florida, where millions of prescription pills were dispensed at “pill mills.”

Such overprescribing and doctor-shopping did contribute to the current epidemic. States have been successful at dispensing fewer prescription opioids, but this doesn’t help the nearly 2.6 million Americans already addicted, or the 329,000 who report currently using heroin.

And, since 2014, it has become clear that the epidemic is no longer just about prescription opioids. In addition, heroin is frequently mixed or substituted with powerful synthetic opioids like fentanyl or carfentanil. They require far more of the overdose reversal drug naloxone than is routinely dispensed in communities.

Meanwhile, in poor and rural areas, community resources for public services are being exhausted by the costs of the epidemic.

Areas that have been disproportionately impacted by the epidemic, like West Virginia, have woefully inadequate access to harm-reduction services like syringe exchange programs and specialty addiction treatment. A clinic at our university that dispenses buprenorphine has more than 600 people on its waiting list. We will soon open a second clinic that will help reduce but not eliminate the waiting list.

A bill passed by President Obama, the 21st Century Cures Act, is making approximately US$1 billion in funding available to help states combat the opioid epidemic. But, as Dr. Keith Humphreys at Stanford University has said: This is not enough. We likely need 50 times that, as Ohio spent $1 billion in 2016 on the opioid epidemic.

Fighting back

It can be hard to grasp the devastation of the opioid epidemic. As the President’s Commission on Combating Drug Addiction and the Opioid Crisis has described it, in the scale of deaths, it’s like the September 11 terrorist attacks happening every three weeks. A national emergency would have been declared 10 years ago if such a disaster occurred every three weeks. And it can be even harder to imagine the emotional turmoil and the depth of sorrow felt by the families who’ve lost their daughters, sons, brothers, sisters, mothers and fathers.

I think it’s fair to say that we all want a simple solution – something that we can wrap our arms around. Something that can be done in one legislative session. But that has not worked and it will not work, just as declaring a national emergency is not enough.

Addiction scientists know what needs to be done to turn the tide. While we may not understand every aspect of the epidemic and certainly need more research to understand these deaths of despair, we are eager to collaborate with communities to find empirically informed solutions, such as medication-assisted treatment. The President’s Commission on Combating Drug Addiction and the Opioid Crisis consists of four politicians and one addiction scientist. It might help to start by asking an expert, rather than politicians, what should be done.

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Medical cannabis growers say education key to improving relationships with city landlords - CBC.ca

Google - Cannabis - Mon, 08/28/2017 - 03:30

CBC.ca

Medical cannabis growers say education key to improving relationships with city landlords
CBC.ca
"I know that some landlords are including clauses in their new leases that you're not allowed to grow marijuana", said Christopher Souster. "I struggle with it from a legal perspective. I don't know of any court that has made a determination on the ...

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OR: In Alaska, Hepatitis C Rate Rises Due To Injection Opioid Use - Jefferson Public Radio

Drug News Bot - Mon, 08/28/2017 - 00:45
ijpr.org (US) Hepatitis C Rate Rises Due To Injection Opioid Use Three-quarters of Alaska's overdose deaths last year are attributed to prescription painkillers or heroin. (Mon Aug 28 21:45:34 2017 PDT) [$drug_related(100%), $drugwar_propaganda(70%), $propaganda_theme2(70%), $propaganda_theme3(65%), $propaganda_theme5(60%), $illegal_drugs(100%), $drugs(90%), $harm_reduction(100%), $syringe_exchange(100%), $chemicals(100%), $euphoric_depressant(100%), $analgesic(100%), $opioid(100%), $narcotic(100%), $opiate(100%), $heroin(100%), $various_drugs(90%), $youth(60%), $school(100%), $aggrandizement(100%)]
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OR: KLDR - Local News

Bot - Cannabis - Mon, 08/28/2017 - 00:41
kldr.com (US) Planning Commission Will Hold Public Hearing on Rural Cannabis Growing Operations The Josephine County Rural Planning Commission is holding a public hearing this evening on the possible regulation of marijuana in Rural Residential zones. (Mon Aug 28 21:41:42 2017 PDT)
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Big-name tech investors pour millions into marijuana — both medicinal and not - STAT

Google - Cannabis - Mon, 08/28/2017 - 00:30

STAT

Big-name tech investors pour millions into marijuana — both medicinal and not
STAT
Wealthy investors are pouring tens of millions into the cannabis industry in a bid to capitalize on the gold rush that's expected when California legalizes recreational marijuana on Jan. 1. They're backing development of new medicinal products, such as ...

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OR: CTUIR won't put legalized marijuana on ballot - Local News - East Oregonian

Bot - Cannabis - Mon, 08/28/2017 - 00:25
eastoregonian.com (US) That means tribal members will not vote on legalizing cannabis in the upcoming Nov. 14 general election. Said some tribal members have been interested in legalizing marijuana since the state did it several years ago. (Mon Aug 28 21:25:37 2017 PDT)
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OR: Willamette Week -- Portland News, Movies, Music, Restaurants, Arts - Willamette Week

Bot - Cannabis - Mon, 08/28/2017 - 00:23
wweek.com (US) Five Anti-Anxiety Cannabis Strains to Try The Xanax of Weed Try these high CBD strains. (Mon Aug 28 22:23:30 2017 PDT)
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OR: Five Anti-Anxiety Cannabis Strains to Try - Willamette Week

Bot - Cannabis - Mon, 08/28/2017 - 00:23
wweek.com (US) This Chunky Crunch is everything I want in an indica. indica-dominant hybrid. (Mon Aug 28 22:23:30 2017 PDT)
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OR: Willamette Week -- Portland News, Movies, Music, Restaurants, Arts - Willamette Week

Bot - Cannabis - Mon, 08/28/2017 - 00:23
wweek.com (US) Get Relaxed With Coalitionb s Cannabis Beerb Before Trump Comes For Them Portland's Coalition Making CBD Beer Even After DEA Classes Drug the Same as Heroin Cannabidiol (can-na-buh-DYE-all) is the unscheduled cousin compound to THC that doesnb t provide the cocktail of psychoactive effects generally referred to as b getting baked. (Mon Aug 28 22:23:30 2017 PDT)
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OR: The DEA Investigates Cannabis-Oil Company True North Extracts - Willamette Week

Bot - Cannabis - Mon, 08/28/2017 - 00:23
wweek.com (US) The DEA Investigates Cannabis-Oil Company True North Extracts - Willamette Week The DEA Investigates Cannabis-Oil Company True North Extracts has sold a marijuana product it says is pure. (Mon Aug 28 22:23:30 2017 PDT)
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OR: The DEA Wants to Treat CBD Like It's Meth, But Oregon's Still Putting Out Innovative New CBD Products - Willamette Week

Bot - Cannabis - Mon, 08/28/2017 - 00:23
wweek.com (US) Which is not psychoactive beyond making people more chill and less epileptic. Was listed alongside heroin and PCP. (Mon Aug 28 22:23:30 2017 PDT)
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FL: Broward teacher arrested on federal marijuana smuggling charges - Sun Sentinel

Bot - Cannabis - Mon, 08/28/2017 - 00:23
sun-sentinel.com (US) Pleaded not guilty to federal charges she was part of a marijuana-smuggling conspiracy. (Mon Aug 28 19:23:13 2017 PDT)
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FL: Broward pre-school teacher admits she was part of 667-pound marijuana-smuggling conspiracy - Sun Sentinel

Bot - Cannabis - Mon, 08/28/2017 - 00:23
sun-sentinel.com (US) Broward pre-school teacher admits she was part of 667-pound marijuana-smuggling conspiracy - Sun Sentinel Broward pre-school teacher admits she was part of 667-pound marijuana-smuggling conspiracy - Sun Sentinel Broward teacher admits role in 667-pound pot smuggling case Tarakiki Dozier. (Mon Aug 28 19:23:13 2017 PDT)
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